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Codes Index TMTW1 - TSP21

TMTW1 ff TOFIF1 ff TOVP1 ff TRAOTJP1 ff TSATW1 ff TSO1 ff
TOA1 ff TOTA2SF1 ff TPAWC1 ff TRE1 ff TSBF1 ff TSP1 ff
TOCOS1 TOTO1 TPTC1 ff TRTE1 ff TSEW1 ff  
TODC1 TOTSF1 ff TPTV1 ff TRTW1 ff TSH3OF1 ff  
          Main Codes Index ^

Indexes

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Item Code: TMTW1

First line: I keep my horse I keep my whore

Source Edition: The Widdow (1652), 3.1, p.27

First performed: revived 16 November 1660 (L.S)

UMI(2) reel no.: 151:7

Author: Thomas Middleton, Ben Jonson and John Fletcher (?)

Composer: Unrecorded ( nwc)

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.250, n.1536 [Music] Second Book of the Pleasant Musical Companion, Part II (1686), no.26 (UMI(2) 193:3) et alia. Note that the score records the song as being from Henry the Fourth.

Text of song:

La. Well, here comes one I'm sure you never heard then.

Song.

I keep my Horse, I keep my Whore,
I take no Rents, yet am not poor;
I traverse all the Land about,
And yet was born to never a foot:
With Partridge plump, with Woodcock fine
I doe at midnight often dine;
And if my Whore be not in case,
My Hostesse daughter h'as her place;
The Maids sit up, and watch their turns,
If I stay long the Tapster mourns;
The Cook-maid has no mind to sin,
Though tempted by the Chamberlin;
But when I knock, oh how they bustle,
The Ostler yawns, the Goldings justle.
If Maid but sleep, oh how they curse her!
And all this comes of, Deliver your purse sir.

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Item Code: TMTW2

First line: How round the world goes and everything that's in it

Source Edition: The Widdow (1652), 3.1, p.29.

First performed: revived 16 November 1660 (L.S)

UMI(2) reel no.: 151:7

Author: Thomas Middleton, Ben Jonson and John Fletcher (?)

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

La. You shall have Songs enough.

Song.

How round the world goes, and every thing that's in it,
The Tydes of gold and silver, ebb and flow in a minute:
From the Usurer to his Sons, there a current swiftly runs,
From the Sons to Queans in chief, from the gallant to the Thief,
From the Thief unto his Host; from the Host to Husband-men;
From the Country to the Court, and so it comes to us agen.
How round the world goes, and every thing that's in it,
The Tides of gold and silver, ebb and flow in a minute.

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Item Code: TMTW3

First line: If in this question I proposed to thee

Source Edition: The Widdow (1652), 3.1, p.31.

First performed: revived 16 November 1660 (L.S)

UMI(2) reel no.: 151:7

Author: Thomas Middleton, Ben Jonson and John Fletcher (?)

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Song.

I. If in this question I proposed to thee
Be any, any choice,
Let me have thy voice.
2. You shall most free.
I. Which hadst thou rather be
If thou might choose thy life,
A Fools, a fools Mistress,
Or an old mans wife?
2. The choice is hard, I know not which is best,
One ill y'ar bound too, and I think that's least.
I. But being not bound, my dearest sweet,
I could shake off the other.
2. Then as you lose your sport by one,
You lose your name by t'other.
I. You counsell well, but love refuses,
What good counsell often chooses.

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Item Code: TMTW4

First line: Give me fortune give me health

Source Edition: The Widdow (1652), 4.1, pp.51-2.

First performed: revived 16 November 1660 (L.S)

UMI(2) reel no.: 151:7

Author: Thomas Middleton, Ben Jonson and John Fletcher (?)

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Song, in parts by the Thieves.

Give me fortune, give me health,
Give me freedom, I'le get wealth.
Who complains his fate's amiss,
When he has the wide world his?
He that has the Devill in fee,
Can have but all, and so have wee.
Give us fortune, give us Health,
Give us freedom, wee'l get wealth.
In every Hamlet, Town and Cittie,
He has Lands, that was born wittie.

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Item Code: TOA1

First line: Distracting jealousies and fears

Source Edition: Alcibiades (1675), 2.1, pp.16-7.

First performed: 22? September 1675

UMI(2) reel no.: 644:4

Author: Thomas Otway

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Priest Sings.

Distracting Jealousies and fears,
Heart-breaking sobs and restless tears
Fly to the breasts that are
Wrack't with despair
In this,
Priest. Or this.
Cho. No tears but those of Joy, no paintings but of bliss.
Priestess. Yes, yes, by Love alone we see
On Earth the glorys of a Diety:
For 'tis the greatest work above,
To be innocent and Love.
Those then that flame so nobly here,
What Ravishing delights must they have there!
Cho. Who on Earth to their honour are just, and their Love
Must reap the chief blessings above.
Priest. Let's then proceed, and Hymens aid implore,
To joyn those hands whose hearts were link't before.
Priestess. Agreed.
Priest. Agreed.
Priestess. Agreed.
Priest. Agreed.
Cho. Hymen, Oh Hymen, come away,
Crown the wishes of this day.
See, see these pure refin'd desires,
Wait at thy Torch, wait at thy Torch to improve their fires.

Whilst this Chorus is singing, Hymen enters with his Torch, and joyns their hands with a Wreath of Roses, which the Priestess strikes with her Spear and breaks, then they offer both parts upon the Altar.

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Item Code: TOA2

First line: The brightest goddess of the sky

Source Edition: Alcibiades (1675), 4.1, p.33.

First performed: 22? September 1675

UMI(2) reel no.: 644:4

Author: Thomas Otway

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Qu. Fye! put these formal complements away,
Ardella sing that Song I heard to day.

SONG.

<1.>

The brightest Goddess of the Sky,
How did she panting sighing lye,
And languishing desire to dye!
For the Triumphant God of war,
Amidst his Trophies did appear,
As charming rough as she was fair.

2.

Their loves were blest, they had a Son,
The little Cupid, who has shown
More conquest then his Sire e're won.
He grew the mightiest God above,
By which we him a Rebel prove
To heav'n, that dares be so to Love.

3.

How soft the delights, and how charming the joy,
Where love and injoyment each other support!
Let the Cynical fool call pleasure a toy,
Who ne're fame i'th'Camp had, nor love in the Court:
O so kindly the Combates each other succeed,
Where 'tis Triumph to dye, and a Pleasure to bleed.

Alci. The Air is charming.---

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Item Code: TOA3

First line: Princes that rule and empires sway

Source Edition: Alcibiades (1675), 5.1, pp.52-3.

First performed: 22? September 1675

UMI(2) reel no.: 644:4

Author: Thomas Otway

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

K. Boy take thy Lute, and with a pleasing ayr
Appease my sorrows, and delude my care. [Sits down.

SONG.

<1.>

Princes that Rule and Empires Sway,
How transitory is their State!
Sorrowes thee gloryes do allay,
And richest Crowns have greatest weight.

2

The mightiest Monarch treason fears,
Ambitious thoughts within him rave;
His life all discontent and cares;
And he at best is but a Slave.

3.

Vainly we think with fond delight,
To ease the burden of our cares.
Each grief a Second does invite,
And sorrows are each others heirs.

4.

For me my honour I'l maintain,
Be gallant generous and brave;
And when I Quietude would gain,
At least I find it in the grave.

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Item Code: TOA4

First line: Come my Salla come away

Source Edition: Alcibiades (1675), 5.2, pp.57-9.

First performed: 22? September 1675

UMI(2) reel no.: 644:4

Author: Thomas Otway

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

SCENE a darkn'd Tent.

[Timandra asleep upon a Couch, a Spirit comes and Sings.

Merli. Come my Salla, come away,
Thy Merli calls.
Salla within. Whither?
Merli. Hither, w'ave no bus'ness to day,
And where innocence sleeps we securely may play.
Salla. I come. [Enters.
Merli. So welcome my dear,
But first let's disperse the black Clouds that are here.
Both. Round about this place we range,
And it's gloomy darkness change,
To a bright delightful Grove,
A proper Scene for happy love.

The SCENE changes to Elizium.

Merli. Next to divert this fair one, alt
Our wing'd Companions, we'l call,
And the Ayr far musicke charm,
Whilst they their measures here perform.

Both. Come all you bright forms that inhabit the Ayr,
And ease with your pleasures the cares of the fair,
Here frolick and slip, oh no longer delay!
But let each clap his wings and away.

Several Spirits of the ayr descend and Dance.

Salla. Now let us discover the mansions of rest,
Where lovers with eternal joyes are blest.

[A glorious Temple appears in the Ayr, where the Spirits of the happy are seated.

See fair one, see, not long e're you
To those glorious seats shall go.
Another Spi. The lustful Queen thirsts for your blood,
And you are for the World too good.
Merli. Nor shall you come alone, your lovers too
Must meet a Fate the same with you.
Salla. But here your troubles all shall cease,
'Tis the Seat of endless bliss.
Cho.Here in endless pleasures they
Keep eternal Holyday.
Here they Revel, Sport, and are
Crown'd with joys still new and rare,
Their pleasures too can never dye,
But like themselves have Immortality.
Merli. See the kind Spirits smile, and now
They'l bless her with a nearer view.

[The whole body of the Temple moves downward.

Cho. Descend oh ye gloryes descend!
Who with blessings eternal are crown'd;
To this Nymph your kind influence lend:
Whilst all the Sphears with harmony resound.
Merli. She wakes, let the apparition go,
By th'damp upon my wings I know
Something ill is drawing near,
Come Salla, come away, Oh come away my dear.

[They all vanish, and the SCENE changes again to the Tent.

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Item Code: TOCOS1

First line: Come Jug my honey let's to bed

Source Edition: The Cheats of Scapin (1677), not printed in play.

First performed: c.January 1677

UMI(2) reel no.: 614:7 (1677)

Author: Thomas Otway

Composer: Thomas Farmer ( nwc)

Lyrics: Not recorded, but ascribed to Thomas D'Urfey by Day and Murrie

Performer/s: Mr. Reading and Mrs. Norris

Source/s of Music: Day and Murrie, p.200, n.659 [Music] Thomas D'Urfey, Choice New Songs, 1684, pp.12-3 (UMI(2) 490:6) and others.

Text of song:

The WEDDING: A Dialogue between John and Jug...

<I.>

John. Come Jug, my Honey, let's to bed,
It is no Sin, sin we are wed;
For when I am near thee, by desire,
I burn like any Coal of Fire.

Jug. To quench thy Flames I'le soon agree,
Thou art the Sun, and I the Sea;
All Night within my Arms shalt be,
And rise each Morn' as fresh as he.

Chorus. Come on then, and couple together, come all,
The Old and the Young, the Short and the Tall;
The Richer than Cressus, and poorer than Job,
For 'tis Wedding and Bedding that Peoples the Globe.

II.

John. My Heart and all's at thy Command;
And tho' I've never a Foot of Land,
Yet six fat Ews, and one milch Cow,
I think, my Jug, is Wealth enow.

Jug. A Wheel, six Platters, and a Spoon,
A Jacket edg'd with blue Galloon;
My Coat, my Smock is thine, and shall,
And something under best of all.

Chor. Come on then, &c.

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Item Code: TODC1

First line: Behold ye powers this bleeding fair

Source Edition: Don Carlos, Prince of Spain (1676), song not printed in play.

First performed: 8 June 1676

UMI(2) reel no.: 644:7 (1676)

Author: Thomas Otway

Composer: John Eccles

Performer/s: Mrs. Cibber

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.182, n.347 [Music] Score is in A Collection of Songs, 1696, f.9, the only known copy of which is in the Royal College of Music, London. Score unavailable to compiler.

Text of song:

Lyrics unavailable to compiler.

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Item Code: TOFIF1

First line: Song has no lyrics

Source Edition: Friendship in Fashion (1678), 1.1, p.7.

First performed: 5 April 1678

UMI(2) reel no.: 326:17

Author: Thomas Otway

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Saunt. 'Twas Victoria, my Lady Fairfields Daughter that came to Town last Summer when Goodvile was marri'd. He in love with her, poor Soul!---I shall beg his pardon there as I take it--- [Sings.

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Item Code: TOFIF2

First line: Ah Phyllis if you wou'd not love

Source Edition: Friendship in Fashion (1678), 1.1, p.7.

First performed: 5 April 1678

UMI(2) reel no.: 326:17

Author: Thomas Otway

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

<Cap.> ---Ah Phyllis, if you wou'd not love
The Shepherd, &c. [Sings.

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Item Code: TOFIF3

First line: As Cloe full of etc

Source Edition: Friendship in Fashion (1678), 1.1, p.8.

First performed: 5 April 1678

UMI(2) reel no.: 326:17

Author: Thomas Otway

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

L. Squ. Mr. Caper! your most Devoted.---Oh dear Mr. Saunter! a thousand thanks to you for my Song.

Saunt. Your Ladiship does your Servant too much honour.

[Sings, As Cloe full of, &c.

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Item Code: TOFIF4

First line: Song has no lyrics

Source Edition: Friendship in Fashion (1678), 1.1, p.10.

First performed: 5 April 1678

UMI(2) reel no.: 326:17

Author: Thomas Otway

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Saunt. Let me die! your Ladiship obliges me beyond expression---Malagene, thou shalt hear me. [Sings a Song in a French Tone.

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Item Code: TOFIF5

First line: How bless'd he appears

Source Edition: Friendship in Fashion (1678), 2.1, p.17.

First performed: 5 April 1678

UMI(2) reel no.: 326:17

Author: Thomas Otway

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Goodv. <...> Now that nothing may be wanting, Lettice you must sing the Song I brought home t'other Morning, for Musick is as great an encouragement to drinking, as fighting.

Song.

<1.>

Lettice sings. How bless'd he appears,
That revels and loves out his happy years,
That fiercely spurs on till he finish his race:
And knowing life's short, chooses living apace.
To cares we were born, 'twere a folly to doubt it,
Then love and rejoyce, there's no living without it.

2.

Each day we grow older;
But as fate approaches, the brave still are bolder.
The joys of Love with our Youth slide away,
But yet there are pleasures that never decay:
When Beauty grows dull, and our Passions grow cold,
Wine still keeps its Charms, and we drink when w'are old.

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Item Code: TOFIF6

First line: Would Phyllis be mine and for etc

Source Edition: Friendship in Fashion (1678), 2.1, p.19.

First performed: 5 April 1678

UMI(2) reel no.: 326:17

Author: Thomas Otway

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Saunt. Oh Lord, you are pleas'd to be merry: Sure he takes me for a Fool; but no
matter for that.---Sings.---

Would Phyllis be mine, and for, &c.

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Item Code: TOFIF7

First line: When Phyllis watched her harmless sheep

Source Edition: Friendship in Fashion (1678), 2.1, p.20.

First performed: 5 April 1678

UMI(2) reel no.: 326:17

Author: Thomas Otway

Lyrics: George Etherege

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.378, n.3783. Song is from Etherege's 'The Comical Revenge' (1664)--see GETCR1 for score.

Text of song:

L. Squ. Oh dear and sweet Mr. Saunter shall oblige us with a Song.

Saunt. O Madam, Ten thousand, ten thousand if you please: I'le swear, I believe I could sing all Day and all Night, and never be weary.

[Sings.

When Phyllis watcht her harmless Sheep,
Not one poor Lamb, &c.

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Item Code: TOFIF8

First line: When beauty can't move and our passions grow cold (reprise)

Source Edition: Friendship in Fashion (1678), 3.1, p.29.

First performed: 5 April 1678

UMI(2) reel no.: 326:17

Author: Thomas Otway

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Trum. See where he comes with a heart as gay and light, as if there were nothing but honesty in it.

Enter Goodvile.

Sings.

When Beauty can't move, and our passions grow cold,
Wine still keeps its charms, and we drink when w'are old.

<NOTE: This is a reprise of the final couplet of TOFIF5 , excepting "can't move" replaces "grow dull">.

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Item Code: TOFIF9

First line: In January last

Source Edition: Friendship in Fashion (1678), 3.1, p.30.

First performed: 5 April 1678

UMI(2) reel no.: 326:17

Author: Thomas Otway

Lyrics: Thomas D'Urfey

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.263, n.1752. Song is from Thomas D'Urfey's 'A Fond Husband' (1677)--see TDAFH2 for score.

Text of song:

L. Squ. Mr. Truman, Mr. Goodvile, and Ladies, I beseech you do me the favour to hear Mr. Malagene sing a Scotch Song: I'le swear I am a strange Admirer of Scotch Songs, they are the pretti'st soft melting gentle harmless things---

Saunt. By Dad, and so they are.---In January last---[Sings.

Val. Deliver us! A Scotch Song! I hate it worse then a Scotch Bagpipe, which even the Bears are grown weary of, and have better Musick. I wish I could see her Ladiship dance a Scotch Jigg to one of 'em.

<NOTE: One more line of dialogue separates this song from the next one>.

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Item Code: TOFIF10

First line: Song has no lyrics

Source Edition: Friendship in Fashion (1678), 3.1, pp.30-1.

First performed: 5 April 1678

UMI(2) reel no.: 326:17

Author: Thomas Otway

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

<NOTE: One line of dialogue separates this song from the previous one>.

Mal. I must needs beg your Ladiships pardon, I have forgotten the last new Scotch Song: But if you please, I'le entertain you with one of another nature, which I am apt to believe will be as pleasant.

L. Sq. Let me die, Mr. Malagene, you are eternally obliging me.

Malag. sings an Irish Cronon.

Malag. Well, Madam, how like you it Madam, hah?

L. Sq. Really it is very pretty now---the pretti'st odd out of the way Notes. Don't you admire it strangely?

Mal. I'le assure your Ladiship I learnt it of an Irish Musician that's lately come over, and intend to present it to an Author of my Acquaintance to put it in his next Play.

L. Sq. Ha, ha, Mr. Valentine, I would have you learn it for a Serenade to your Mistriss,---ha, ha, ha.

Val. My Page, Madam, is docible, and has a pretty voice, he shall learn it if you please; and if your Ladiship has any further service for him---

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Item Code: TOFIF11

First line: Frank Frank Frank etc

Source Edition: Friendship in Fashion (1678), 4.1, p.42.

First performed: 5 April 1678

UMI(2) reel no.: 326:17

Author: Thomas Otway

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

L. Squ. I will not part with you, you ill-natur'd Creature; you shall not goe:---I vow, I'll cry a Rape if you offer to stir:---oh my heart, here's Malagene.

Enter Malagene Singing Frank, Frank, Frank, &c.

Malag. Why how now Frank, what a pox, out of humour? Why Madam, what have you done to him; what have you done to him Madam? Lord how he looks!---why Frank I say, prethee bear up.

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Item Code: TOFIF12

First line: Fa la da la la

Source Edition: Friendship in Fashion (1678), 4.1, p.46.

First performed: 5 April 1678

UMI(2) reel no.: 326:17

Author: Thomas Otway

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Goodv. 'S death you Coxcomb, mind your singing, do you hear? and play the Fool by yourself, or---

Saunt. Sing Sir? so I can, Fa La Da La La, &c. Victoria your Mistress!

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Item Code: TOFIF13

First line: Song has no lyrics

Source Edition: Friendship in Fashion (1678), 4.1, p.47.

First performed: 5 April 1678

UMI(2) reel no.: 326:17

Author: Thomas Otway

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Both. Dear Soul Adieu.

[Embracing him.

[Exeunt Singing and Dancing.

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Item Code: TOFIF14

First line: Song has no lyrics

Source Edition: Friendship in Fashion (1678), 5.1, p.58.

First performed: 5 April 1678

UMI(2) reel no.: 326:17

Author: Thomas Otway

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Cap. Hey day! Fiddles!

Saunt. Madam Goodvile hearing we were here, hath sent for 'em on purpose to regale us.

Enter Mrs. Goodvile, Lady Squeamish with the Fiddles playing, Saunter falls to sing the Tune with 'em, and Caper Dances to it. Lettice.

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Item Code: TOFIF15

First line: To love is a pleasure divine

Source Edition: Friendship in Fashion (1678), 5.1, pp.58-9.

First performed: 5 April 1678

UMI(2) reel no.: 326:17

Author: Thomas Otway

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Sings.

To love is a pleasure Divine,
Yet I'll never sigh or be sad;
They are Coxcombs that languish and pine,
So long as Whores are to be bad.---To daroll, darolda.

<This song is reprised after a few lines of dialogue>

Sir Nob. Slaves! Avaunt! if my Lady will have it so, I'll walk soberly into the Garden and consider of what is past.

[To love is a pleasure, &c

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Item Code: TOTA2SF1

First line: Nous allons [Brave strippons]

Source Edition: The Atheist: or, The Second Part of the Souldiers Fortune (1683), 4.1, p.42.

First performed: July 1683, or earlier (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 644:6 (1684)

Author: Thomas Otway

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Fath. <...> Come along my little Spit-fires.

Nous allons.
Brave strippons.
Sans scavoir ou Nous allons.

Six Bumpers in a hand <...>

<NOTE: Not clear whether recited or sung>.

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Item Code: TOTA2SF2

First line: Welcome mortal to this place

Source Edition: The Atheist: or, The Second Part of the Souldiers Fortune (1683), 4.2, pp.46-7.

First performed: July 1683, or earlier (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 644:6 (1684)

Author: Thomas Otway

Composer: Simon Pack ( nwc)

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.368, n.3598 [Music] Playford, John, Choice Ayres and Songs...Fifth Book (1684), p.22 (UMI(2) 286:15) et alia.

Text of song:

Beaug. <...> What, Musick again! This is a merry Region, I'll say that for it, where ever it be, Boy!

Dwarf. Did you call, Sir?

Beaug. My Cloaths, Monster; my Vestments: I hate a Dis-habiliee mortally: I long to be rigg'd, that I may be fit for Action, if Occasion should present it self. [Dwarf dresses him.

A SONG.

1.

Welcom Mortal to this place,
Where smiling Fate did send thee:
Snatch thy happy Minutes, as they pass;
Who knows how few attend thee!

2.

Floods of Joy about thee roul,
And flow in endless measure.
Dip thy Wishes deep, and fill thy Soul
With Draughts of every Pleasure.

3.

Feast thy Heart with Love's Desire,
Thy Eyes with Beauties Charms:
With Imaginations fan the Fire.
Then stifle it in thy Arms.

4.

For, since Life's a slippery Guest,
Whose Flight can't be prevented;
Treat it, whilst it stays here, with the best,
And then 'twill go contented.

<5.>

Come you that attend on our Goddesses Will,
And sprinkle the Ground
With Perfumes around;
Shew him your Duty, and shew us your Skill.

Enter four Black Women, that dance to the same Measure of the Song, and sprinkle Sweets.

<6.>

Circle him with Charms,
And raise in his Heart
Such Alarms,
As Cupid ne'er wrought by the Pow'r of his Dart.

They dance round him.

<7.>

Fill all his Veins with a tender desire,
And then shew a Beauty to set 'em a fire;
Till kind panting Breasts to his Wound she apply,
Then on those white Pillows of Love let him die.

[The Dance ends.

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Item Code: TOTA2SF3

First line: Like a dog with a bottle [Fast tied to his tail]

Source Edition: The Atheist: or, The Second Part of the Souldiers Fortune (1683), 4.2, p.52.

First performed: July 1683, or earlier (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 644:6 (1684)

Author: Thomas Otway

Composer: Thomas Stafford ( nwc)

Lyrics: Thomas Flatman

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.279, n.2043 [Music] Playford, John, Choice Ayres and Songs...Fifth Book (1684), p.30 (UMI(2) 286:15). Lyrics first appeared in Westminster Drollery (1671), p.221 (UMI(2) 402:33), the score first appearing in New Ayres and Dialogues (1678), pp.18-21 (not on microfilm).

Text of song:

Court. (Sings) Like a Dog with a Bottle, &c.

Sylv. Thou perfect Yoke-fellow! Thou heavy Ox,
That want'st-a Goad to make thee know thy strength!
Death, Fiends and Torments! I could dig those Eyes out!
I'll bear't no longer: Bedlam! Bedlam! Bedlam!

Court. sings, and dances a Jigg.

Sylv. No more! I'll stay no more to be his Triumph <...>

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Item Code: TOTA2SF4

First line: Song has no lyrics

Source Edition: The Atheist: or, The Second Part of the Souldiers Fortune (1683), 5.1, p.74.

First performed: July 1683, or earlier (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 644:6 (1684)

Author: Thomas Otway

Tune (if traditional): Old Simon (?)

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Fath. My Jacky! my little Rogue! my dainty Boy! Thou Son of thy nown Father, I can hold no longer; and I must kiss thee, and I will kiss thee, e e e e you Dog, you Dog, you Dog, you little dear damn'd Dog. [Sing Old Simon.<speaks> Huzza, the Widow's our own: There lie Divinity.

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Item Code: TOTO1

First line: Come all ye youths whose hearts e're bled

Source Edition: The Orphan: or, The Unhappy-Marriage (1680), 5.1, p.55.

First performed: Late February 1680 (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 644:12

Author: Thomas Otway

Composer: Francis Forcer ( nwc)

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.196, n.591 [Music] Playford, John, Choice Ayres and Songs...Third Book (1681), pp.24-5 (UMI(2) 286:13) et al.

Text of song:

SONG.

<1>

Come, all ye Youths, whose Hearts e're bled
By cruel Beauties Pride,
Bring each a Garland on his head
Let none his Sorrows hide,
But hand in hand around me move
Singing the saddest Tales of Love;
And see, when your Complaints ye joyn,
If all your Wrongs can equal mine.

2

The happyest Mortal once was I,
My heart no Sorrows knew.
Pity the Pain with which I dye,
But ask not whence it grew.
Yet if a tempting Fair you find
That's very lovely, very kind,
Though bright as Heaven whose stamp she bears,
Think of my Fate, and shun her Snares.

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Item Code: TOTSF1

First line: And was she not frank and free

Source Edition: The Souldiers Fortune (1680), 4.[2], p.50.

First performed: Mid-June 1680 (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 644:15 (1681)

Author: Thomas Otway

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Court. Sings. And was she not frank and free.
And was she not kind to me.
To lock up her Cat in her Cupboard,
And give her key to me, to me:
To lock up her Cat in her Cupboard,
And give her key to me.

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Item Code: TOTSF2

First line: God prosper long our noble king

Source Edition: The Souldiers Fortune (1680), 4.1, p.51.

First performed: Mid-June 1680 (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 644:15 (1681)

Author: Thomas Otway

Tune (if traditional): Chevy Chase ( nwc)

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.229, n.1167 [Music] Wit and Mirth, Volume Three (1707), pp.82-8 (CT(1) 8822:03) et al.

Text of song:

<Court.> Sings. God prosper long our Noble King,
Our Lives and Safeties all.

<speaks> I am mighty loyal to Night.

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Item Code: TOTSF3

First line: Bonney lass gan thou wert mine

Source Edition: The Souldiers Fortune (1680), 4.[3], p.54.

First performed: Mid-June 1680 (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 644:15 (1681)

Author: Thomas Otway

Composer: Thomas Farmer (recorded as Francis Forcer by Day and Murrie) ( nwc)

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.185, n.399 [Music] Playford, John, Choice Ayres and Songs...Third Book (1681), p.17 (UMI(2) 286:13) et al.

Text of song:

<Sir Jol.> Sings.

<I.>

Bonney Lass gan thou wert mine,
And twonty thoosand poonds aboot thee, &c.

<The remaining lyrics are derived from the score>

I'd scorn thy Gow'd for thee my Queen,
To lay down on any Green,
And shew thee how thy Daddy got thee.
I'd scorn thy Gow'd for thee my Queen,
To lay thee down on any Green,
And shew thee how thy Daddy got thee.

II.

Bonny Lad, gin thou wert mine,
And twenty thousand Lords about thee;
I'd leave them aw to kiss thine Eyn,
And gang with thee to any Green,
To shew me how my Daddy got me.
I'd leave them, &c.

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Item Code: TOTSF4

First line: Youth's a flower that soon does fade

Source Edition: The Souldiers Fortune (1680), 5.[4], p.67.

First performed: Mid-June 1680 (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 644:15 (1681)

Author: Thomas Otway

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Sir Jol. Pish! A Pox of Anthony and Cleopatra, they are dead and rotten long ago, come, come, time's but short, time's but short, and must be made the best use of; for

Youth's a flower that soon does fade,
And life is but a span,
Man was for the Woman made,
And Woman made for Man.

Why now we can be bold <...>

<NOTE: Not clear whether recited or sung>.

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Item Code: TOTSF5

First line: Go from the window my love my love

Source Edition: The Souldiers Fortune (1680), 5.[4], pp.68-9.

First performed: Mid-June 1680 (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 644:15 (1681)

Author: Thomas Otway

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Sir Jol. <...> I'l sing a Song like a dying Swan, and try to give 'em warning.

Go from the Window, my Love, my Love, my Love,
Go from the Window, my Dear.
The Wind and the Rain
Has brought 'em back again,
And thou can'st have no Lodging here.

<speaks> Oh Lord, search my House!

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Item Code: TOVP1

First line: Dum dum derum dump

Source Edition: Venice Preserv'd, or, A Plot Discover'd (1682), 5.1, p.62.

First performed: 9 February 1682

UMI(2) reel no.: 614:8

Author: Thomas Otway

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Anto. Hayty tayty, is it so indeed, with all my heart, faith---Hey then up go we, faith---hey then up go we. dum dum derum dump.[Sings.

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Item Code: TOVP2

First line: Dum dum derum dump

Source Edition: Venice Preserv'd, or, A Plot Discover'd (1682), 5.1, p.62.

First performed: 9 February 1682

UMI(2) reel no.: 614:8

Author: Thomas Otway

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Anto. Hang'd, sweet heart, prithee be quiet, hang'd quo h-a, that's a merry conceit, with all my heart, why thou jok'st, Nacky, thou art given to joking, I'll swear; well, I protest, Nacky, nay, I must protest, and will protest that I love joking dearly, man. And I love thee for joking, and I'll kiss thee for joking, and towse thee for joking, and odd, I have a devilish mind to take thee aside about that business for joking too, odd I have, and Hey then up go we, dum dum derum dump. [Sings.

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Item Code: TPAWC1

First line: Away away flatter no more

Source Edition: A Witty Combat (1663), 3.3, sig.D2.

First performed: June 1663 (Harbage & Schoenbaum); 1662-3? (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 396:16

Author: Thomas Porter?

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Mr. King. I think thou long'st for't John, hearken and thou may'st hear her John, 'tis her voice I promise thee. sings above.

Yo. Carlet. 'Tis a sweet one,---hold good Sister hold, I love a good voice as I love my life.

SONG.

Away, away, flatter no more
My easie Faith, for now I see
What thou in me seem'd to adore
Thou mak'st thy pleasures property;
No more, no more will I believe
The man that can so soon deceive;

Yo. Carlet. Excellent, excellent,---Oh good
She goes on.
Sister listen a little.

SONG.

Nor was it flattery that did,
Betray my heart, but that I lov'd,
For which my Reason hath been chid,
And I the said effects have prov'd;
Then go, and I no more will see
The man that has abused me.

<NOTE: It is difficult to determine whether the first reference to singing refers to a song to which no lyrics are provided or whether the subsequent lyrics are intended to be sung at that point>.

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Item Code: TPAWC2

First line: Song has no lyrics

Source Edition: A Witty Combat (1663), 5.1, sig. F[1].

First performed: June 1663 (Harbage & Schoenbaum); 1662-3? (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 396:16

Author: Thomas Porter?

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Enter Musick.

George Carlet. Come here's a good divertion, what Songs have you?

Fidler. A hundred and fifty, two hundred if need be, I furnish all the Faires and markets with 'em; I keep a Poet in pay on purpose Gentlemen, which is no small charge to me you must think, 'tis true the Poet is a prety wit but what's wit or good lines, nothing, unless well Humour'd and well Sung, I sing 'em all my self, though the lines be never so bad I make 'em twang, which sets off a Poet mainly you know.

George Carleton. Pox take you for a puppy, leave praising your self and hear us hear a Song.

Fidler. What Song will you have Gentlemen?

Omnes. Any, any.

Fidler. What say you to that of the love between a Kitchin Wench and a Chimney Swifter.

Yo. Carlet. Sirrah d'ye know where you are.

Fidler. I cry you mercy Sir, I'le fit you with a rare one.

Sings.

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Item Code: TPTC1

First line: Look out for shame look out

Source Edition: The Carnival (1663), 2.1, pp.18-9.

First performed: 1663-4

UMI(2) reel no.: 396:14

Author: Thomas Porter

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Antonio Sings, they Play the Chorus still altogether.

Look out, for shame look out,
And put your Lover out of Doubt,
That thinks the Sun has lost his light,
And that you run his Course to night.

Chorus Play'd.

Look out, for shame look out,
And put your Lover out of doubt,
That else may think he has lost his way,
When not enlightned by your day.

San. <spoken> Heer's stuff;
Nay, play on, play on, Sir, I can sing
More to this Tune.

Sancho Sings.

Look out, for shame look out,
And put your Lover out of doubt,
Who's heart susteins a cruel load,
Because he thinks your gon abroad.

Look out, for shame look out,
And put your lovers out of doubt,
Who else would leave to Bawle and sing,
But that they think you are within.

Fel. Look out, for shame look out,
And show to us thy dainty Snout,
Rather then wander in the Street, [Bursts open the door with his foot and Enters.
Thus Doors we open with our feet.

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Item Code: TPTC2

First line: Si chires que lo ramo

Source Edition: The Carnival (1663), 2.1, p.25.

First performed: 1663-4

UMI(2) reel no.: 396:14

Author: Thomas Porter

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Qui. Why then be merry; be merry, or I'le be
Out of humour, and then who shall dance the Pavan
With Ossorio?

[Sings, Si chires que lo ramo.

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Item Code: TPTC3

First line: Those that do talk of Sysiphus stone

Source Edition: The Carnival (1663), 3.1, pp.30-2.

First performed: 1663-4

UMI(2) reel no.: 396:14

Author: Thomas Porter

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Lorenzo. <...> Come, take your Seats. Madam, what
Think you of an Ayre, as they are serving
In? nay, it shall be one of my own Composing;
For, some years past, when I was not so
Much taken up with business, I did employ
My time in Poesie.

Elv. What you please, my Lord.

Lor. Bartolo, bid them sing the Song was
Sung when I acted the Sea-god with the
Cornucopia. Ah, Bartolo, those were merry
Days! thou didst Act Tantalus, I remember: troth
It was a very dainty Masque; for all
The Company were kept in suspence till the last, and
Did never comprehend what we meant.

Fer. That could not chuse but be rare.

Lor. Why, I have writ Verses
That the best Wit in Sevil will never be able to
Understand.

Anto. Very likely, my Lord:
But I hope these we are to hear [They serve whilst this is singing.
Are not of that strain.

Lor. That you shall be Judge of.

The SONG.

Those that do talk of Sysiphus stone,
Which makes him continually rolling to sweat;
And call that a Hell, when in faith it is none;
For no Torment is like to the wanting of meat.
Then alack poor Tantalus, Tantalus cryes,
I only can feed by the sight of my Eyes!

The Vulture that feeds on Prometheus heart,
Oh how happy does him poor Tantalus think!
For when he has quite consumed that part
The Curse of the Wretch affords new meat and drink.
Then alack poor Tantalus, Tantalus cryes,
I only can feed by the sight of my Eyes!

When first against heaven the Giants did rebell,
It was not Ambition that made them such Hectors;
But hearing of dainty Ambrosia tell,
They had a mind to taste of it, and tipple the Nectar.
Then, &c.

Anto. Most excellent, faith!
But pray what Feet do you allow
Your Verses, my Lord?

Lor. Feet, ha, ha, ha!
Pox of Feet; let them regard them
That live by them.

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Item Code: TPTC4

First line: Song has no lyrics

Source Edition: The Carnival (1663), 4.1, p.46.

First performed: 1663-4

UMI(2) reel no.: 396:14

Author: Thomas Porter

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Enter Sancho, in a ridiculous French Dress; The People and Boys after him.

Sings and Dance's a ridiculous Corant.

Boys. O Brave Monsieur Kick-hose.

San. Away, ye Rogues, ta ran ta, ran ta, ta la ran.

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Item Code: TPTC5

First line: Ta ran ta ran tan

Source Edition: The Carnival (1663), 5.2, p.60.

First performed: 1663-4

UMI(2) reel no.: 396:14

Author: Thomas Porter

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

San. May be so: ta ran, ta ran tan. [Sings and Dances up and down carelesly.

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Item Code: TPTC6

First line: The beard the beard the bonny bonny beard

Source Edition: The Carnival (1663), 5.2, pp.63-4.

First performed: 1663-4

UMI(2) reel no.: 396:14

Author: Thomas Porter

Tune (if traditional): To the Tune of the Broom the bonny Broom.

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Ant. Here, friends, this is the house,
The Accident hapned last night,
You know the tune I made the Song to

Gen. I, I, Come, shall we begin.

To the Tune of the Broom, the bonny Broom.

The Beard, the Beard, the bonny bonny Beard,
Oh, it was of a wondrous growth,
But eating too fast
His spoon he misplac'd,
And scalded it off with the broth.

Chorus still of Musick.

But O what sight, one part did stand upright,
As if it had guarded his face.
The other off by the stumps,
Which needs must put him in a dumps,
Had quite deserted the place.

Which makes it plain, that that which doth remain
Doth Centry stand for two,
The other side was lost,
And beaten off his Post,
For some think that it lay, Perdue.

Oh, the Beard, the Beard, the bonny, &c.

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Item Code: TPTV1

First line: How happy and free is plunder

Source Edition: The Villain (1662), 1.1, pp.9-10.

First performed: 18 October 1662

UMI(2) reel no.: 329:1 (1663)

Author: Thomas Porter

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Enter Fidlers.

See here, I think they're come.

Bou. What are you, Gentlemen,
The merry Boys, that saw a heart in sunder
With your Rosin?

Mus. This Gentleman bespoke us here to night.

D'el. I did so, pray begin.

Mus. What shall we play, Sir?

D'el. the newest Ayrs. They play an Ayr or two.

Bout. Pox o' these fine things;
Can you not play the Siege of Rochel?

Mus. Yes, Sir.

D'el. Fie, Boutefeu, there's a Tune for Ladies.

Bout. Why then let them play
The Tune we made the Song to th'other night.

La'mar. sings the Tune to the Musique.

La'mar. I, I, by any means.
Lum terum, tum, &c.

Mus. <speaks> Oh, Sir, we know the Tune.

Bout. Begin then; D'elpeche, you shall bear your part.

D'el. My hope is they'l not understand us.

La'mar. Come, come, I'l begin.

The Song.

La'mar. How happy and free is plunder,
When we care not for Jove nor his Thunder?
Having entred a Town,
The Lasses go down,
And to their O're-comers lie under.

Chorus together. Then why should we study to love, and look pale,
And make long Addresses to what will grow stale?

Bout. If her fingers be soft, long, and slender,
When once we have made her to render,
She will handle a Flute
Better far than a Lute,
And make what was ha---rd to grow te---nder.

Chor. Then why should we study, &c.

All three sing this together. When the houses with flashes do glitter,
We can sever our sweets from the bitter,
And in that bright night
We can take our delight,
And no Dam'sel shall scape but we'l hit her.

Chor. Then why should we study, &c.

<NOTE: The second song follows immediately after this>.

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Item Code: TPTV2

First line: See where Calisto wheels about

Source Edition: The Villain (1662), 1.1, pp.10-1.

First performed: 18 October 1662

UMI(2) reel no.: 329:1 (1663)

Author: Thomas Porter

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

<NOTE: This song follows immediately after the previous one>.

D'el. Peace, peace, pray peace,
The window opens.
Play and sing that I sent you to night.

Mus. We shall, Sir:

La'mar. Plague o' you Tuning, ye Dogs,
Cannot your Instruments stand in Tune
One quarter of an hour?

D'el. Prethee, La'march, be silent,

SONG.

<1.>

See where Calisto wheels about
The Northern Axle-tree of Heav'n,
And swift Bootes still does Rout
Before his Lash the glittering Seven.
View then those Eyes which are more fair
Than any Star that glitters there.

2.

Fair Cassiopeia, would'st thou gain
The Prize of glory in thy Sphere?
Try then to borrow of these Twain
Two pair of Eyes that shine more clear
For whilst they sparkle here below,
Obscurer Lights we cannot know.

3.

In nights they far out-shine the Moon,
And render them like glorious days,
They may contend at heighth of Noon
To equalize the Sun's bright Rays:
Their Coronet of Hair, though brown,
Does far out-shine Ariadne's Crown.

4.

Then gently dart those beams; for know,
How quick and fiercely they surprize
The Centinels that expect below
The dawning of your beauteous Eyes.
We are your Plants, and if we thrive,
'Tis by your influence that we live.

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Item Code: TPTV3

First line: When Celadon gave up his heart

Source Edition: The Villain (1662), 2.1, pp.25-6.

First performed: 18 October 1662

UMI(2) reel no.: 329:1 (1663)

Author: Thomas Porter

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

D'el. We have beaten a Parly, or rather Truce
For sometime, for we have left Parlying;
But fairest Mariane, will you but bless
Our ears with one sweet Ayr.

Mar. My Sister, Sir, sings much better.

Fran. Nay fie, Sister, now I must say
You shall sing, you should else have wanted
My intreaty; jeer me before company?
You know I never could, nor would sing.

D'el. I hope her authority and my prayers may be Successful.

Mar. I will not long be intreated,
For then you will expect much more
Than what you're like to hear from me.

Franc. Sister, prethee sing When Celadon gave up his heart.

Mar. No laughing, Gentlemen, I bar that before-hand,
Your pardon I'l beg afterwards.

SONG.

<1.>

When Celadon gave up his heart
A Tribute to Astrea's eyes;

She smil'd to see so fair a prize,
Which beauty had obtained, more than Art:
But jealousy did seemingly destroy
Her Chiefest comfort, and her Chiefest Joy.

2.

Base Jealousy, that still dost move
In opposition to all bliss;
And teachest those to do amiss,
Who think by thee, they tokens give of Love:
But if a Lover ever will gain mee,
Let him love much, but fly all jealousy.

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Item Code: TPTV4

First line: Amarillis told her swain

Source Edition: The Villain (1662), 2.1, pp.26-7.

First performed: 18 October 1662

UMI(2) reel no.: 329:1 (1663)

Author: Thomas Porter

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Franc. Fy, fy, Gentlemen, come give me your hands again, Sister prethee one Song A la Ronde.

They all Joyn hands and dance in a Ring, Answering all-together at the Chorus.

SONG.

Maria. Amarillis told her Swain,
Amarillis told her Swain, [Chorus etiam bis.
That in love he should be plain
And not think to deceive her.

Chor. Still he protested on his truth
That he would never leave her.

If thou do'st keep thy vow quoth she,
And that thou ne'r do'st leave me, [Chorus bis.

Ther's ne'r a Swain in all this plain
That ever shall come near thee

Chor. For Garlands and Embroider'd Scrips,
For I do love thee dearly.

But Colin if thou change thy Love,
But Colin if thou change thy Love, [Chorus etiam bis.
A Tygress then I'l to thee prove
If e'r thou dost come near me.

Cor. Amarilis fear not that,
For I do Love thee dearly.

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Item Code: TPTV5

First line: When as King Peppin rul'd in France

Source Edition: The Villain (1662), 3.1, p.45.

First performed: 18 October 1662

UMI(2) reel no.: 329:1 (1663)

Author: Thomas Porter

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Host. Away, Woman, away---

Sings.

When as King Peppin rul'd in France,
A King of wundrous Might,
He that could the Coranto dance,
Was straight wayes made a Knight.

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Item Code: TPTV6

First line: Please you monsieurs entertain

Source Edition: The Villain (1662), 3.1, pp.45-6.

First performed: 18 October 1662

UMI(2) reel no.: 329:1 (1663)

Author: Thomas Porter

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Host. <...> Sings.

Please you Mounsieurs Entertain
The Damoisels yee bring,
Here's Cheer, There nere was such in Spain,
And Wine would Fox a King.

Here's Capons that from Bruges came
In post for expedition,
And Veal so white, that none in Gant
Can come in Competition.

Here's Sallet mystick savour has
As mystick as the colour,
A Lover being put to grass,
Pick't it against Love's dolour.

Here's vin de Bon, vin de Champaing
And vin de Celestine,
And here is that they call Bouru,
VVhich to Loves Sports incline.

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Item Code: TPTV7

First line: Ye may tipple and tipple and tipple all out

Source Edition: The Villain (1662), 3.1, p.48.

First performed: 18 October 1662

UMI(2) reel no.: 329:1 (1663)

Author: Thomas Porter

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Host. <...> If you'l hear Musick, and a Song with't,
I'm ready: you shall want nothing here.

Sings.

Yee may Tipple, and Tipple, and Tipple all out,
Till yee baffle the Stars, and the Sun face about.

Delpe. Away with your Drunken songs, have you nothing fitter to please the Ladies?

<NOTE: The next song follows immediately after this one>.

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Item Code: TPTV8

First line: Song has no lyrics

Source Edition: The Villain (1662), 3.1, p.48.

First performed: 18 October 1662

UMI(2) reel no.: 329:1 (1663)

Author: Thomas Porter

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

<NOTE: This follows immediately after the previous song>.

Delpe. Away with your Drunken songs, have you nothing fitter to please the Ladies?

Host. Yes Sir.

Delpe. Come away with it then.

Host Sings.

<NOTE: Although this song follows immediately after another by the Host which has lyrics, the dialogue clearly indicates that this is a different song being sung>.

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Item Code: TPTV9

First line: The bells were rung and the mass was sung

Source Edition: The Villain (1662), 5.1, pp.80-1.

First performed: 18 October 1662

UMI(2) reel no.: 329:1 (1663)

Author: Thomas Porter

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Charl. Why, I did beg of Heaven, and that was deaf,
Deaf to my Zealous prayers;
Ile never pray agen: but I will sing
My self into his blest Society.

SONG.

The Bells were rung, and the Mass was sung,
And all was for my Billy,
And all my friends my death had sworn,
I wou'd have none but Willy.

<NOTE: The subject matter and structure of the following suggests it to be a continuation of the song, despite twenty-nine lines of dialogue separating the two>.

Char. sings.

Willy was fair, Willy was stout,
Willy was like the Lilly;
And Willy promis'd to marry me.

<spoken> O! but he could not; for he dy'd, or else he would
Have kept his promise: was ever poor maid
So couzen'd; speak, were you ever couzen'd?

<NOTE: The next song follows immediately after this>.

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Item Code: TPTV10

First line: Lady preserve the title of your heart

Source Edition: The Villain (1662), 5.1, p.81.

First performed: 18 October 1662

UMI(2) reel no.: 329:1 (1663)

Author: Thomas Porter

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

<NOTE: This follows immediately after the previous song>

Franc. May be some Musick may still her spirits, Sir:
Shall my Sister sing?

D'orv. I Pray let her.

Fran. Sing Sister! prethee sing!

Mariana sings.

Lady preserve the Title of your heart,
And ne're commit so rash a deed
As when your Lover doth depart,
You may not leave off sorrow with your weed:
Spoil not what once was thought so fair,
But quench remaining fire with a Tear;
And bury, when the next does come,
And sad remembrance in this Tomb.

<NOTE: The next song follows immediately after this one>.

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Item Code: TPTV11

First line: Beyond the malice of abusive fate

Source Edition: The Villain (1662), 5.1, p.82.

First performed: 18 October 1662

UMI(2) reel no.: 329:1 (1663)

Author: Thomas Porter

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

<NOTE: This follows immediately after the previous song>

Char. Away, thou art out of tune and sence,
If I needs must hear Musick,
Let it be my poor Boy's Voice;
He once could please me with his melancholly Songs,
Pray, let him sing.

D'or. Any thing to please thee, poor Charlotte.

Song within by the Boy.

Beyond the malice of abusive fate
I now am grown, and in that state
My heart shall mourn the loss it has receiv'd,
When of its only joy it was bereav'd;
The Woods with ecchoes do abound,
And each of them return the sound
Of my Amintor's name; alas, he's dead,
And with him all my joys are fled,
Willow, Willow, Willow must I wear,
For sweet Amintor's dead, why was my dear.

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Item Code: TPTV12

First line: Find me a lonely cave

Source Edition: The Villain (1662), song not printed in play.

First performed: 18 October 1662

UMI(2) reel no.: 329:1 (1663)

Author: Thomas Porter

Composer: John Eccles ( nwc)

Performer/s: Mrs. Hodgson

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.220, n.1007 [Music] Mercurius Musicus, April 1699, pp.77-9. First appeared in A Collection of Songs, 1696, f.7--not on microfilm.

Text of song:

Find me a lonely Cave,
Remote from human kind,
Dark as the midnight Grave,
And dismall as my mind;
There let me sigh my soul away;
And mourn at cruel death's delay.

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Item Code: TRAOTJP1

First line: Slaves are they that heap up mountains

Source Edition: Aristippus; or The Joviall Philosopher (1630), p.5.

First Performed: revived 1667?

UMI(1) reel no.: 1824:5

Author: Thomas Randolph

Composer: William Gregory ( nwc)

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.350, n.3289 [Music] Hilton, John, Catch that Catch can (1667), pp.112-3 (UMI(2) 148:6).

Text of song:

Simp. <...> O what had become of me if I had not gone bare-foot to my Praeceptor, with a Satchell at my backe.

Enter two Schollers.

Slaues are they that heap vp mountaines,
Still desiring more and more,
Still let's carouse in Bacchus fountaines,
Neuer dreaming to be poore.
Giue vs then a Cup of liquor,
Fill it vp vnto the brim,
For then me thinks my wits grow quicker
When my braines in liquor swim.

<speaks> Ha braue Aristippus.
Pox of Aristotle and Plato, and a company of dry Raskalls:
But they braue Aristippus.

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Item Code: TRAOTJP2

First line: What ails thou thou musing man

Source Edition: Aristippus; or The Joviall Philosopher (1630), p.5.

First Performed: revived 1667?

UMI(1) reel no.: 1824:5

Author: Thomas Randolph

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

1 Schol. What ayles thou, thou musing man,
Tiddle diddle dooe.
2 Schol. Quench thy sorrowes in a Can,
Tiddle diddle dooe.

Compossibilitas? why that's nothing man <...>

<NOTE: Not clear whether recited or sung>.

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Item Code: TRAOTJP3

First line: But come you lads that love canary

Source Edition: Aristippus; or The Joviall Philosopher (1630), pp.6-7.

First Performed: revived 1667?

UMI(1) reel no.: 1824:5

Author: Thomas Randolph

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

1. The Vniuersitie Ramist, a Mault Heretique; alias the Wilde man that is growne mad to see the daily resort to Aristippus: but let vs leaue him to his frenzies:

But come you Lads that loue Canarie,
Let vs haue a mad fegarie:
Hether, hether, hether, hether,
All good Fellowes flocke together.

<NOTE: Not clear whether recited or sung>.

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Item Code: TRAOTJP4

First line: I wish you all carefully [Drink sack but sparingly]

Source Edition: Aristippus; or The Joviall Philosopher (1630), pp.16-7.

First Performed: revived 1667?

UMI(1) reel no.: 1824:5

Author: Thomas Randolph

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Aristip. I know some of these halfe penny Almanack makers doe not approue of this Philosophie, but giue you most abominable counsell in their Beggars Rhymes, which you are bound to beleeue as faithfully, as their predictions of foule and faire weather, you shall heare some of Errapaters Poetry.

I wish you all carefully,
Drink Sack but sparingly,
Spend your coyne thriftily,
Keepe your health warily,
Take heed of ebriety,
Wine is an enemy,
Good is sobriety,
Fly baths and Venery.

For your often potations much crudities cause <..>

<NOTE: Not clear whether recited or sung>.

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Item Code: TRAOTJP5

First line: There is a drink made of the Stygian lake

Source Edition: Aristippus; or The Joviall Philosopher (1630), pp.17-8.

First Performed: revived 1667?

UMI(1) reel no.: 1824:5

Author: Thomas Randolph

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Aristip. But farre better speaks the diuine Ennius against your Ale, and Barly broath, who knew too full well the vertue of Sack when Nunquam nisipotus ad arma prosiluit dicenda; his verses are in Latine, but because the audience are Schollers, I haue translated them into English, that they may be vnderstood. Here read them.

1 Schol. There is a drinke made of the Stygian Lake,
Or else of the waters the Furies doe make,
No name there is bad enough which it to call,
But yet as I wist it is ycleped Ale;
Men drinke it thick, and pisse it out thin,
Mickle filth by Saint Loy that is leaues within,
But I of complexion am wondrous sanguine,
And will loue by'th Morrow a cup of wine,
To liue in delight was euer my wonne,
For I was Epicurus his owne sonne,
That held opinion that plaine delight
Was very felicity perfite:
A Bowle of wine is wondrous boone cheere
To make one blith, buxome, and deboneere,
'Twill giue me such valour and so much courage
As cannot be found 'twixt Hull and Carthage.

<NOTE: Not clear whether recited or sung>.

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Item Code: TRAOTJP6

First line: Fill me a bowl of sack with roses crown'd

Source Edition: Aristippus; or The Joviall Philosopher (1630), pp.18-9.

First Performed: revived 1667?

UMI(1) reel no.: 1824:5

Author: Thomas Randolph

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

2 Schol. Fill me a Bowle of Sack with Roses crown'd,
Fili't to the brim, Ile haue my temples bound
With flowry Chaplets, and this day permit
My Genius to be free, and froliquest;
Let me drinke deepe, then fully warm'd with wine,
Ile chaunt AEneas praise, that euery line
Shall proue immortall, till my moistned quill
Melt into verse; and Nectar-like distill;
I'me sad, or dull, till bowles brim fil'd infuse
New life in me, new spirit in my Muse,
But once reuiu'd With Sack, pleasing desires
In my chill bloud kindle such actiue fires,
That my gray hayres seeme fled my wrinckl'd face,
Growne smooth as Hebes, youth, and beauties grace,
To my shrunk veines fresh bloud and spirits bring,
Warme as the Summer sprightfull as the spring,
Then all the world is mine. Cresus is poore
Compar'd with me, he is rich that askes no more,
And I in Sack haue all, which is to me
My home, my life, health, wealth, and liberty,
Then haue I conquer'd all, I boldly dare
My Trophies with the Pelean Youth compare,
Him I will equall, as his sword, my pen
My conquer'd world of cares, his world of men,
Doe not, Atrides, Nestors ten desire
But ten such drinkers as that aged sire,
His streame of honied words flowed from the Wine,
And Sacke his Councell was, as he was thine.
Who euer purchast a rich Indian mine,
But Bacchus first, and next the Spanish wine,
Then fill my bowle, that if I dye to morrow,
Killing cares to day, I haue out-liu'd my sorrow.

<NOTE: Not clear whether recited or sung>.

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Item Code: TRAOTJP7

First line: Aristippus is better in every letter

Source Edition: Aristippus; or The Joviall Philosopher (1630), pp.20-1.

First Performed: revived 1667?

UMI(1) reel no.: 1824:5

Author: Thomas Randolph

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Sim. O God Sir, when I was in the state of ignorance, I cond it without booke, thinking it had beene a Position.

Aristippus is better in euery letter,
Then Faber the Parisiensis,
Then Scotus, Soncinas, then Thomas Aquinas,
Then Gregorie Gandauensis:
Then Cardan and Ramus, then old Paludanus,
Albertus, and Gabriella,
Then Pico Mercatus, or Scaliger Natus,
Then Niphus or Zabarella.
Hortado, Trombetus, were fooles with Toletus,
Zanardus, and Will de Hales,
With Occham, Iauellus, and mad Algazellus,
Philoponus and Natalis.
The Conciliator, was but a meere prater,
And so was Apollinaris:
Iandunus, Plotinus, the Dunce Eugubinus,
With Masius, Sauill, and Swarez,
Fonseca, Durandus, Becanus, Holandus,
Pererius, Auienture:
Old Trismegistus, whose volumes haue mist vs,
Ammonius, Bonauenture,
Mirandula Comes, with Proclus and Somes,
And Guido the Carmelita:
The nominall Schooles, and the Colledge of fooles,
No longer is my delighta:
Hang Brirewood and Carter, in Crakenthorpes garter,
Let Keckerman too bemoane vs,
I'le be no more beaten, for greasie Iacke Seaton,
Or conning of Sandersonus.
The censure of Cato's, shall neuer amate vs,
Their frostie beards cannot nip vs:
Your Ale is too muddy, good Sacke is our studie,
Our Tutor is Aristippus.

<NOTE: Not clear whether recited or sung>.

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Item Code: TRAOTJP8

First line: We care not for money riches or wealth

Source Edition: Aristippus; or The Joviall Philosopher (1630), p.29.

First Performed: revived 1667?

UMI(1) reel no.: 1824:5

Author: Thomas Randolph

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Aristip. Giue him a Gowne then ere we admit him to our Lecture hereafter. Now noble Signior Medico de Campo, if you will walke in, let's be very iouiall and merry, 'tis my second birth-day, let's in, and drinke a health to the company:

We care not for mony, riches, or wealth,
Old Sack is our mony, old Sack is our health,
Then let's flock hither
Like Birds of a feather,
To drinke, to fling,
To laugh and sing,
Conferring our notes together,
Conferring our notes together,
Come let vs laugh, let vs drinke, let vs sing,
The winter with vs is as good as the spring,
We care not a feather
For wind, or for weather,
But night and day
We sport and play,
Conferring our notes together,
Conferring our notes together,

<NOTE: Not clear whether recited or sung>.

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Item Code: TRE1

First line: Ah lay by your lute

Source Edition: Edgar, or The English Monarch (1677), 3.1, pp.27-8.

First performed: Unknown

UMI(2) reel no.: 331:17

Author: Thomas Rymer

Composer: James Hart ( nwc)

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.166, n.62 [Music] Playford, John, Choice Ayres and Songs...Third Book (1681), p.16 (UMI(2) 286:13).

Text of song:

Alfrid leaning asleep with a Lute in hand, her Woman sings.

THE SONG.

AH! lay by your Lute;
Ah, Lucasia! forbear.
Whilst your Tongue I may hear,
Other Musick is mute.
Ah! lay by your Lute.
For the Heav'ns have decreed, that my Heart should submit
To none but the Charms of your Wit.

The Conflict was hot,
When I first met your Eyes;
Yet my Heart would still rise,
Though through and through shot.
The Conflict was hot.
But your Wit's great Artillery when drawn to the field,
Oh then 'twas my glory to yield.

To satisfie all,
When an Empire is due
To each Beauty in you,
The Worls is too small,
To satisfie all.
With the rest you in Triumph shall sit and survey;
But give Wit all the Spoils of the day.

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Item Code: TRE2

First line: Love the ambrosia of the blest

Source Edition: Edgar, or The English Monarch (1677), 4.1, pp.38-9.

First performed: Unknown

UMI(2) reel no.: 331:17

Author: Thomas Rymer

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

These retiring, Tritons dance: They retiring, 3 Sirens arise out of the Sea, and sing.

THE SONG.

1. Siren. Love, the Ambrosia of the Blest!
'Tis Love in Heav'n that makes the Feast.
O Mortalls, Mortalls, come and tast.

2. Sir. Whilst jingling Honour strives for place,
And vertue sets her ugly Face,
The Moments, the sweet Moments pass.

3. Sir. It cools, alas, how fast it cools!
Fall to, ye men, ye men with Souls,
And Ceremony leave to Fools.

All. When Nature invites,
And keen Appetites,
Care tearing your Hearts and tormenting,
Is some Devil in the way,
That creates your Delay?
Or a Bug of some Bigott's inventing?

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Item Code: TRTE1

First line: I languish all night and sigh all the day

Source Edition: Tom Essence, or The Modish Wife (1676), 2.2, p.20.

First performed: Late August 1676 (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 398:8 (1677)

Author: Thomas Rawlins (the Younger)

Lyrics: Edward Ravenscroft

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.250, n.1541. See ERTCTG1 for details.

Text of song:

Lau. Baulk not a young Lover in his first Address, for by all those fine things my Heroe is saying to thy Lady, thy beauty has so smitten me, that I languish all night, and sigh all the day, and so forth. (he sings.

Luce. And never saw me before?

Lau. Yes, but I have---thy likeness, but let that pass.

Luce. My likeness Sir?

Lau. Yes, thine, little wilde Cat: Let me see, where was it?---oh, in my Dream last night; me-thoughts thou wert the kindest, comingst thing---but a Pox on these backward Interpretations of Dreams, for I find, That fancy did, what Phillis will not do. (sings.

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Item Code: TRTE2

First line: Let Fortune and Phillis frown if they please

Source Edition: Tom Essence, or The Modish Wife (1676), 3.2, p.32.

First performed: Late August 1676 (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 398:8 (1677)

Author: Thomas Rawlins (the Younger)

Composer: 1. Pelham Humphrey ( nwc); 2. Pelham Humphrey ( nwc)

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.275, n.1969 and p.305, n.2500 [Music] Playford, John, Choice Songs and Ayres (1673), pp.33 and 19 (UMI(2) 221:12) and others.

Text of song:

Mrs. M. <...> I'le never Love again-- (Sing) Let Fortune and Phillis frown if they please, I'le no more on their Deities call,<speaks> and so forth--Is not this better than your whining:<sings> Oh Love, if e're thou't ease a heart which owns thy power Divine--<speaks> Damne such effiminacy...

<NOTE: The first song ("Let Fortune...) is from Westminster Drollery II, the second ("Oh Love...") is from Crowne's Charles the Eighth--see JCC8OF1>.

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Item Code: TRTE3

First line: Sweet Philida be not so coy

Source Edition: Tom Essence, or The Modish Wife (1676), 3.2, pp.32-3.

First performed: Late August 1676 (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 398:8 (1677)

Author: Thomas Rawlins (the Younger)

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

She sings

Sweet Philida, be not so Coy,
I love not to ravish a Kiss:
Your peevishness will but destroy
The hopes of enjoying true Bliss.

If the Lover you like, does offer
To give you the proofs of his flame,
And you fondly reject his kind proffer,
Too late your own folly you'le blame.

Then yield to what e're he desires,
And slight not his Critical Love;
VVith your vigorous Lover retire,
You'le quickly the pleasure approve.

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Item Code: TRTE4

First line: Song has no lyrics

Source Edition: Tom Essence, or The Modish Wife (1676), 3.2, p.34.

First performed: Late August 1676 (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 398:8 (1677)

Author: Thomas Rawlins (the Younger)

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Mrs. M. By my hands, I'le confirm what they have writ---

(Mrs. Mon. Sings, Dances, and pulls Theo. about.)

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Item Code: TRTE5

First line: Sweet Philida be not so coy (reprise)

Source Edition: Tom Essence, or The Modish Wife (1676), 3.2, p.35.

First performed: Late August 1676 (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 398:8 (1677)

Author: Thomas Rawlins (the Younger)

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Mrs. M. Little one, give me thy hand; as gad sa'me good flesh, and of a lushious Constitution: I find I shall be desperately in Love; Adieu, my Soul, Adieu: But doest hear, be more complesant and agreeable the next time we meet. Sings, Sweet Philida, be not so coy, I love not to ravish a Kiss.

<NOTE: This is a reprise of TRTE3 >.

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Item Code: TRTE6

First line: Ah sacred boy desist for I

Source Edition: Tom Essence, or The Modish Wife (1676), 4.1, pp.39-40.

First performed: Late August 1676 (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 398:8 (1677)

Author: Thomas Rawlins (the Younger)

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Betty. Now Wit assist me--- (aside. (Feels in her Pocket, pulls out a Song. My Master Sir, has sent me to know how Madam Theo. does this morning, and presents her with the effects of his Love, in a Song which he writ last Night before he went to Bed.

Old M. <...> Hum, pretty Childish silly stuff;---can you sing it Little one?

Betty. Yes Sir, my Master made it to one of the new Tunes he heard in an Opera at Paris.

Betty Sings.

Ah Sacred Boy desist, for I
Comply with your resistless Art;
Your Arrows with such vigour flye,
Already they've enflam'd my heart.

I will no more despise your power,
But thus submissively obey;
Yet by your favour, 'twas not your,
But Celia's Victory to day.

For had she Vaild that charming face,
And you your keenest Dart had shot;
Yours had been the just disgrace,
And I'd obtain'd the Victors Lot.

Then not your Power, but Chance admire,
In having such a Friend as she,
Who lent you rays t'encrease my fire,
And thus made you a Deity.

Old M. Verry pretty; and as I say, your Master can be serious for all his jollity, Young man.

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Item Code: TRTE7

First line: Who complies with gay youth does prudently choose

Source Edition: Tom Essence, or The Modish Wife (1676), 4.2, p.42.

First performed: Late August 1676 (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 398:8 (1677)

Author: Thomas Rawlins (the Younger)

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Mrs. M. Soft Sir, you'le find your stock little enough for her; and for my part, if I cannot hold out, my Dotards Angels shall turn Prourers at my Command; for I must confess the truth of the Song you gave me, which says---

Mrs. M. Sings.

Who complys with gay Youth, does prudently choose;
She that yields to old Age, does her passion abuse:
She may languish and sigh, but in vain it will prove;
Age, dulls the brisk flames, and slackens hot Love:
He may kindle a fire, but cannot supply;
So, for want of Loves fuel, her passion must dye.
But Youth that's full fraught with Love and desire,
Creates a true flame, and supplys the blest fire:
He'l rally, renew it, and with vigour maintain
What dotage endeavours to do, but in vain.
Then give me a Gallant; when I'm yoakt to old Age,
What the gray-head does raise, his Youth shall asswage.

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Item Code: TRTW1

First line: How wanton and frolick's this age

Source Edition: Tunbridge Wells, or A Day's Courtship (1678), 1.1, pp.2-3.

First performed: c.March 1678

UMI(2) reel no.: 367:9

Author: Thomas Rawlins (the Younger)

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

A SONG within.

How wanton, and frolick's this Age,
Wherein Gallants so briskly invade
The Misses that furnish the Stage,
And the Madams in Maskarade?

Unseen and unknown they still court,
And walk a Corant to and fro,
Bad faces ne're hinder the Sport,
If the Blade's well provided below.

The Ladies make choice by the size,
The Gallants by Garb and Proportion,
And when their brisk Spirits do rise,
They fall to their carnal devotion.

There needs neither Parents consent,
A Joynture nor Rites of the Church,
If fiercely the Gallant be bent,
The Ladies scarce leave him ith' lurch.

Yet if he too faintly pursue
The Idol he seems to adore,
With a frisk she'l bid him adieu,
And leave the young Fop at the door.

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Item Code: TRTW2

First line: Courtwit she's exceeding gay

Source Edition: Tunbridge Wells, or A Day's Courtship (1678), 3.1, pp.23-4.

First performed: c.March 1678

UMI(2) reel no.: 367:9

Author: Thomas Rawlins (the Younger)

Tune (if traditional): To the Tune of "Amarillis"

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Wild. What's here? A Lampoon, and to that Satyrical Tune of Amarillis.

Court. As you love me sing it.

Wild. I have none of the charming'st voices, and may therefore obey you without further intreaty.

LAMPOON.

Courtwit she's exceeding gay
Courtwit she's exceeding gay.
And kisses Wilding, when she may
Without her Brothers knowledge,
For plush Outside, she does deride,
Tho a Member of the Colledge.

Court. The rhiming Fop was much your freind; proceed,

<Wild.> Alinda she is seldom kind;
Alinda she, &c.
Altho' her wit seem much refin'd
I doubt at last 'twill fool her;
For she's of Age, I dare engage
And wants a Man to cool her.

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Item Code: TSATW1

First line: Damon see how charming Chloris

Source Edition: A True Widow (1678), 1.1, p.9.

First performed: 21 March 1678 (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 297:8 (1679)

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Yo. Mag. Why I weigh'd my self, when I writ my last Song, and I wasted six ounces, aver du pois weight in the writing: And I was not above twelve hours about it.

Carl. I beseech you let's hear it Sir.

Yo. Mag. Withal my heart.

Damon see how charming Chloris,
Who gives love to all that see her,
Burning us yet in coldness glories,
And is never freer.
Though darts and flames from her eye fly Sr.
And her Breast is warm and spicy,
Yet there is coldness in her eye Sr.
And her heart's all over Icy.
By coldness I am more inflamed,
As in Winter is Spring water,
My love by scorn can not be tamed,
But I the rather would be at her.

<NOTE: The next song follows immediately after this>.

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Item Code: TSATW2

First line: One night walking in a wood

Source Edition: A True Widow (1678), 1.1, p.10.

First performed: 21 March 1678 (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 297:8 (1679)

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

<NOTE: This song follows immediately after the previous one>.

Prigg. Did this make you waste six ounces? I writ a Song t'other day, and it did not make me waste at all.

Bell. Prithee Prigg let's hear it. [Prigg sings.

One Night walking in a Wood,
I met one was a Maid as good
As e're she coud:
But she fired my Blood,
And to her I stood.
With a hey Boys, ding, ding, ding Boys hey,
With a hey Boys, ding, ding, ding.

Quoth I, my pretty Buxom Lass,
From me this time thou shalt not pass
In any Case;
For the sake of thy Face!
I'l lay thee on the Grass.
With a hey Boys, ding, &c.

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Item Code: TSATW3

First line: Damon see how charming Chloris (reprise)

Source Edition: A True Widow (1678), 2.1, p.25.

First performed: 21 March 1678 (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 297:8 (1679)

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Yo. Mag. But I'l shew you my Song.

Self. Of late I have had no leisure to make a Song, I am so overrun with new Acquaintances.

Yo. Mag. Reads. Damon see how charming Chloris, &c. How do you like it?

Self. 'Tis soft, and very much after my own way, and I like it well. But how like you this Peruque?

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Item Code: TSATW4

First line: Damon see how charming Chloris (reprise)

Source Edition: A True Widow (1678), 2.1, pp.27-8.

First performed: 21 March 1678 (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 297:8 (1679)

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Yo. Mag. I desire you will not interrupt me; I am singing the Ladies a new Song.

Prig. Song? Pish, Is not Gaming better than hearing of Songs? here's such a stir with these Wits.

Isab. No, pray let's hear it.

[Yo. Mag. Sings, Damon, &c.

Prig. I observe you Wits are always making Songs of the Love of Shepherds, and Shepherdesses, a company of block-headed, clownish, ugly, tawny, Sun-burnt People; I had e'en as live hear Songs upon the Love of their Sheep as their own.

<NOTE: The next song follows immediately after this one>.

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Item Code: TSATW5

First line: My mistress is a tennis ball

Source Edition: A True Widow (1678), 2.1, p.28.

First performed: 21 March 1678 (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 297:8 (1679)

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

<NOTE: This song follows immediately after the previous one>.

Prig. Methinks that old Song is very pretty: <sings> My Mistress is a Tennis Ball, &c.

Yo. Mag. This Rogue has nothing but Tennis Courts and Bowling-Greens in his Head.

<NOTE: The next song follows immediately after this one>.

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Item Code: TSATW6

First line: Hey ho hey ho [The merry horn does blow]

Source Edition: A True Widow (1678), 2.1, p.28.

First performed: 21 March 1678 (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 297:8 (1679)

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

<NOTE: This song follows immediately after the previous one>.

Bell. Prithee Prigg sing one of your own making.

Prig. With all my heart <...>

Isab. Pray, Madam, let's hear Mr. Prigg's Song first, 'tis his own.

Prig. I am glad your Ladyship is come to hear it.[Sings.

Hey ho, hey ho,
The merry Horn does blow.
'Tis broad day,
Come away.
Twivee, twivee, twivee, hey,
Do not stay.
Then have at the Hare,
Let old Puss beware.
Twivee, twivee, twivee, ho,
The merry Horn does blow.
Come away.

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Item Code: TSBF1

First line: Song has no lyrics

Source Edition: Bury-Fair (1689), 1.1, pp.10-1.

First performed: April 1689 (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 296:10

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Bell. Observe any Fellow that has a stinking Breath, as if a Voice were not intended to be heard but smelt, will speak in your very Nose: and turn round as often as you will, he turns with you, and your Nostrils must have it. Come begin.

SONG.

VVild. 'Tis very pretty; and delicately Sung.

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Item Code: TSBF2

First line: Fala ha la

Source Edition: Bury-Fair (1689), 1.1, p.12.

First performed: April 1689 (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 296:10

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

La Ro. Vel, vel; no more to be said: I am Monsieur le Count de Cheveux. Serviteur Monsieur my Lor, vot tres humble Serviteur. Fala ha la.

Sings.

VVild. Come, my Lord, your humble Servant, we are to meet at Dinner: I must about this business, my Heart is set upon it; 'twill make an Admirable Farce.

Bell. Get thee gone, Ned, thou art a mad Fellow: I'll go and take a little Air.

La Ro. Allons Monsieur: Fa la la la la.

If my wise Conduct you please to rely on,
I'll make as good a Count, as Count de Brion. [Exeunt.

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Item Code: TSBF3

First line: Song has no lyrics

Source Edition: Bury-Fair (1689), 3.1, p.27.

First performed: April 1689 (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 296:10

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Sir Hum. Now for a fit of Mirth.

Bell. Come Charles, begin.

They Sing an Italian Song of two parts.

You must excuse it; 'tis Country Music, Madam.

Gert. 'Tis admirable! the Court has no better.

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Item Code: TSBF4

First line: There were three men came out of the west

Source Edition: Bury-Fair (1689), 3.1, p.39.

First performed: April 1689 (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 296:10

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

[Bell and Wild. part them. The Ladies shriek, and run to the corner of the Stage. Oldwit staggers amongst them drunk. The Women run out shrieking; with them, Ex. Trim, Sir Hum. Bellamy. Oldwit Sings.

There were three Men came out of the West,
To make Salt-petre strong, &c.

<speaks> Where are my Drunkards...

<Song is reprised a few lines later>

Old. Where is my Goad? my damn'd for better for worse? She has stolen my Drunkards and my Wits from me. Where are my Drunkards? Rogues, let me go to my Drunkards, and my Wits, you Rogues.

There were three Men came out of the West,
To make Salt Petre strong;
To turn it into Gun-powder
For to Charge the King's Cannon.
[The Servants hale him out.

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Item Code: TSEW1

First line: Fa la la

Source Edition: Epsom-Wells (1672), 1.1, p.11.

First performed: 2 December 1672

UMI(2) reel no.: 296:13 (1673)

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Kick. 'Pshaw, prethee hold thy tongue, talk to me---fa, la, la. [Ex. Kick, and Cuff Singing.

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Item Code: TSEW2

First line: Thou shalt have any thing thou shalt have me

Source Edition: Epsom-Wells (1672), 1.1, p.15.

First performed: 2 December 1672

UMI(2) reel no.: 296:13 (1673)

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Bisk. Besides, she would fain learn that new Song of you; she says 'tis a rare one.

SINGS

Thou shalt have any thing, thou shalt have me,
And I have one thing that will please thee.

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Item Code: TSEW3

First line: Song has no lyrics

Source Edition: Epsom-Wells (1672), 2.1, p.22.

First performed: 2 December 1672

UMI(2) reel no.: 296:13 (1673)

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Wood. Look you thus

[Sings, dances and combs his Peruque.

<NOTE: A few lines of dialogue separate this from a reprise>.

Wood. Begin, why? I am at it all this while.

[Sings and Dances again.

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Item Code: TSEW4

First line: How pleasant is mutual love that is true

Source Edition: Epsom-Wells (1672), 2.1, pp.23-4.

First performed: 2 December 1672

UMI(2) reel no.: 296:13 (1673)

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Composer: Nicholas Staggins ( nwc)

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.245, n.1448 [Music] Playford, John, Choice Ayres, Songs and Dialogues...Second Edition (1675), p.38 (UMI(2) 286:16). First appeared in Playford, John, Choice Songs and Ayres...First Book (1673), p.43 (UMI(2) 221:12).

Text of song:

Caro. <...> but now I talk of scribling, divert me a little better, and give me the Song you promis'd me.

Wood. I have taught it your Woman, who I conceive has something a better voice than I, she's here too.

Caro. Sing that Song Mr. Woodly taught you.

She Sings.

How pleasant is mutual Love that is true,
Then Phillis let us our affections unite;
For the more you love me, the more I love you,
The more we contribute to each others delight:
For they that enjoy without loving first,
Still eat without stomach, and drink without thirst.

Such is the poor Fool who loves upon duty,
Because a Canonical Coxcomb has made him,
And ne'er tastes the sweets of love and of beauty,
But drudges because a dull Priest has betray'd him;
But who in enjoyment from love take their measure,
Are rap't with delight, and still ravish't with pleasure.

Each night he's a Bridegroom, and she is a Bride.
When their minds and their bodies shall both so agree;
That neither shall pleasure from the other divide,
But both at one instant shall satisfy'd be;
Let Fools for convenience be drawn to their love,
But this the way real pleasure to prove.

Enter Clodpate and Lucia.

Luc. So, you are pleasant here, Mr. Clodpate, how do you like this Song?'tis a London Song.

Clodp. Ay, Pox on't, I hate it for it; when I had the misfortune to know that damn'd Town first, they had better Songs by half; they put no wit in their Songs now adays.

<NOTE: The dialogue which follows relates both to this and the next song, which occurs a few lines later>.

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Item Code: TSEW5

First line: Lay by your pleading

Source Edition: Epsom-Wells (1672), 2.1, p.24.

First performed: 2 December 1672

UMI(2) reel no.: 296:13 (1673)

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Composer: Unrecorded ( nwc)

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.273, n.1939 [Music] Wit and Mirth; or, Pills to Purge Melancholy...Volume Six (1719), pp.190-2 (CT(1) 4480:06). Score first appeared in Wit and Mirth...Volume Five (1714), pp.30-2 (not on microfilm. According to Day and Murrie the lyrics first appeared in Merry Drollery (1661), although it is absent from the microfilm copy (UMI(2) 1729:10).

Text of song:

<NOTE: The dialogue which precedes the song relates both to this and to TSEW4>.

Caro. Pray do us the favour to Sing one of those you speak of.

Clodp. Faith, Madam, I have but an ordinary voice, but I cannot disobey you.

Sings ridiculously this old Song.

Lay by your pleading,
Law lies a bleeding, &c.

Wood. What an incomprehensible block-head is this.

Clodp. This pleases us in the Country; I know you like it ne're the worse, Madam.

Caro. Nor much the better.

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Item Code: TSEW6

First line: Thou shalt have any thing thou shalt have me (reprise )

Source Edition: Epsom-Wells (1672), 2.1, p.28.

First performed: 2 December 1672

UMI(2) reel no.: 296:13 (1673)

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Bisk. Nay, good Dear, be not so cruel, I protest and vow I could not help it: my Neighbour Fribble is a very merry man, I could not forbear, we were at it, Tory Rory, and sung old Rose, the Song that you love so, Duck.

Thou shalt have any thing, thou shalt have me, &c.

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Item Code: TSEW7

First line: Fa la la la fa

Source Edition: Epsom-Wells (1672), 2.1, p.31.

First performed: 2 December 1672

UMI(2) reel no.: 296:13 (1673)

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Woodly while she scolds sings.

Fa, la, la, la, fa.

Mrs. Wood. Fa, la, la, la---Is that the notice you take of me? If I were not the best Woman in the World, and did not love thee, thou base Fellow, 'twould not trouble me. Oh that I should be so unfortunate, so bewitch'd, to love such a Monster of a man!

Wood. Fa, la, la, la, Oh Impudence!

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Item Code: TSEW8

First line: Oh how I abhor the tumult and smoke of the town

Source Edition: Epsom-Wells (1672), 3.1, pp.42-4.

First performed: 2 December 1672

UMI(2) reel no.: 296:13 (1673)

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Composer: Robert Smith ( nwc)

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.304, n.2475 [Music] Playford, John, Choice Songs and Ayres...First Book (1673), pp.61-2 (UMI(2) 221:12) et alia.

Text of song:

Enter Peg and Fidler.

Peg. Here's the honest Fellow that sings the Song, Madam.

Jilt. I have nothing to say to him, I am troubled with an impertinent Fellow here, and he shall not sing.

Clodp. By your leave, Madam, 'tis in praise of the Country, and he shall sing. Sing, dear Rogue.

Fidler sings.

Oh how I abhor
The tumult and smoak of the Town,
The Clamours of War.
The glittering Court, the fraudulent Gown,
The Suburb debauches,
The Cheats of the City,
The ratling of Coaches,
And the noise of the men they call witty.

Clodp. <speaks> Admirable.

<Fidler sings> But give me the man from all vanity free,
with good store of Land,
And a Country Command,
who honest dares be.
Who Justice dares do, and the Nation will serve,
And ne're from his true Country principle swerve.
This, this is the man for me.

Jilt. Very fine.

<Fidler sings> While the fluttering vain Gallant in London consumes
His Estate in rich Cloaths and Perfumes,
And with drinking and swilling corrupts all his health;
Or on Punk and on Bawd spends his youth and his wealth,
While such shall his wit and his bounty applaud.

Clodp. <speaks> Admirable.

<Fidler sings> Give me the good man that lives on his own grounds,
And within his own bounds
Has room for his Hawks and his Hounds,
Can feast his own Tenants with Fowls and with Fishes,
And from his own plenty with good store of Dishes,
And not with damn'd Wine, but with good English Ale
O're their faithful hearts can prevail,
And nothing to others does owe.
But from his own house hears his own Oxen low,
And his own Sheep bleat,
While the grateful sounds sweet Ecchoes repeat.
This, this is the man that is truly call'd great.

Jilt. <speaks> Excellent, there's a Crown; pray come and sing this to me twice a day as long as I stay in Epsom.

Fid. I will, Madam.

Clodp. 'Tis incomparable, let me embrace thee, there's ten shillings for thee; and if thou wilt live with me in Sussex, thou shalt never see London again.

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Item Code: TSEW9

First line: Her lips are two brimmers of claret

Source Edition: Epsom-Wells (1672), 4.1, p.59.

First performed: 2 December 1672

UMI(2) reel no.: 296:13 (1673)

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

<Clodp.> Sings

Her Lips are two Brimmers of Claret,
Where first I began to miscarry,
Her Breasts of delight
Are two Bottles of white,
And her Eyes are two Cups of Canary.

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Item Code: TSEW10

First line: If she prove constant obliging and kind

Source Edition: Epsom-Wells (1672), 5.1, pp.77-8.

First performed: 2 December 1672

UMI(2) reel no.: 296:13 (1673)

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Enter Fribble, Bisket drunk, with Fidlers.

Bisk. Come on Fiddles, play us a Serenade; a Serenade's a fine merry Tune; we'll be as merry as the veryest Roysters of of 'em all, and as drunk too, an we set upon't, Neighbour Fribble.

Frib. I warrant you, come we are choice Lads; come play a Serenade at this Window, fa, la, la, la.

Bisk. sings. Fa, la. Hold, can't you sing <sings> Hey for Cavaliers, ho for Cavaliers, Dub, a dub, dub, have at old Belzebub, Oliver stinks for fear.

Fid. No an't please you, Sir.

Frib. Ah brave Neighbour Bisket, you are a merry man i' fack.

Bisk. I, am I not? I defie any man in Epsom to be merrier, i'fags. Come let's all be Musitioners, and all roar and sing,

Here's a Health unto his Majesty,
With a Fal, la, la, la, la lero.

Frib. Come on, hey Boys, strike up---

Bisk. Now have I as much courage as any man upon the face of the Earth, if my Sweeting were here I'd beat her extreamly, I'd Chastise my Pigsnye immoderately: I love her, poor Bird, but she's too unruly.

An old senseless Song.

If she prove constant, obliging, and kind,
Perhaps I'le vouchsafe for to love her,
But if pride or inconstancy in her I find,
I'de have her to know I'm above her.

Frib. Bravely resolv'd. But for all that you left me engag'd basely and scurvily.

Enter Mrs. Bisket and Mrs. Fribble.

Mrs. Frib. Mr. Rains shou'd be here by the Fiddles. O lamentable, our Husbands are drunk and roaring and serenading.

<a few more lines of dialogue follow before>

Bisk. sings. But if pride or inconstancy in her I find,
I'de have her to know I am above her.

Mrs. Bisk. Above me! a pitiful Comfit-maker above me! I'le have better men above me. Sirrah, I'le spoil your singing.

Enter Kick and Cuff, with Fiddles.

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Item Code: TSEW11

First line: Leave leave these useless arts

Source Edition: Epsom-Wells (1672), not printed in play.

First performed: 2 December 1672

UMI reel no.: Not applicable

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Composer: Henry Purcell ( nwc)

Source/s of Music: Day and Murrie, p.274, n.1948 [Music] Hudgebut, John, Thesaurus Musicus... Second Book, 1694, pp.33-4 (UMI(2) 1926:18) and others.

Text of song:

Leave, leave these useless Arts,
Leave, leave these useless Arts in loving;
Seeming anger and disdain:
Trust, trust to nature gently,
Gently, gently moving, nature
Never, never, never, never, never, never,
Never, never, never, never, never pleads in vain;
Nothing, nothing guides a lovers passion,
Nothing guides a lovers passion,
Like, like the fair ones inclination,
Like the fair ones inclination.

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Item Code: TSH3OF1

First line: After I had your orders last night

Source Edition: Henry III of France, Stabbed by a Friar, with the Fall of the Guise (1672), 2.2, p.23.

First performed: c.June? 1672 (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 512:14 (1678)

Author: Thomas Shipman

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Musick far off. Spirit descending leasurely. Sings this, viz.

SPIRIT SINGS.

After I had your Orders last night,
I met with a path all paved with light,
And yet with my passing I made it more bright.
Then through the lowest Region I flew,
Sousing through falling Bogs of Dew,
By the Moon's Orb then swiftly I past,
No lightening nor thought made ever such haste;
Nor did I stay, till Venus I found
All cover'd with Roses, and with Mirtles Crown'd.
Each Rose did in native Scarlet appear;
Yet every Rose was outblush'd by her,
Because I found Mars in the midst of her Sphear.
Your Summons he read, and obey'd with a Nod,
I had ne'r gain'd else that stubborn God.
Then I flew to an Orb, that was much more than bright;
With Diamonds studded and roof'd o'r with light.
I knew't could be none
But Jupiter's Throne;
My Summons he read, and obey'd with a frown.
And now all the three are there coming down.
No fate ne'r so dark escape can their sense,
Since each of 'em is an intelligence.
Look, Sir, they hover, all three hover there, [Spirit descends.
Wave but your Wand, and all three will appear. [Waves his Wand.

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Item Code: TSH3OF2

First line: I come from the deeps below

Source Edition: Henry III of France, Stabbed by a Friar, with the Fall of the Guise (1672), 2.2, p.24.

First performed: c.June? 1672 (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 512:14 (1678)

Author: Thomas Shipman

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

The Fry'r Waves his Wand. Reads, then Loud Musick, th' Earthy Spirit ascends with this

SONG.

I come from the Deeps below,
Where Coral branches bud.
From where the Rubies grow
From the Rocks richest blood.
Altho in the Deeps, little darkness we know;
The Diamond's our Sun,
The Pearl is our Moon,
And the rest of our Jewels are stars there below.

The Earthy Spirit then clear rises...

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Item Code: TSH3OF3

First line: With amorous wiles and perjur'd eyes

Source Edition: Henry III of France, Stabbed by a Friar, with the Fall of the Guise (1672), 3.1,pp.48-9.

First performed: c.June? 1672 (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 512:14 (1678)

Author: Thomas Shipman

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

Ling. Dear Chateneuf, may I a Song obtain.
It is a favour that I beg to gain.

Chat. You may command, and best of all can tell,
That I sing true, altho I sing not well.

SONG.

With amourous wiles and perjur'd eyes
False Damon did me move,
Like Charming Winds his kindling sighs
First fann'd me into Love.
My thriving Passion he did feed,
Whilst it was young and slight,
But ah! when there was greatest need,
Alas he starves it quite!

Was ever more injustice known,
O Damon, prithee say;
To fit my heart for thee alone,
And cast it now away.
Henceforth my Passion I shall hate.
'Cause it gain'd none for me;
Yet love it too (such is my fate)
Because it was for thee.

Thy Heart I never will upbraid,
Altho it mine did kill,
Ah! Think upon an injur'd Maid
That's forc'd to Love thee still.
But Justice may the Tables turn
In vindicating me;
And thou with equal torments burn
For one who Loves not Thee.

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Item Code: TSH3OF4

First line: Love shot himself into my breast like flame

Source Edition: Henry III of France, Stabbed by a Friar, with the Fall of the Guise (1672), 3.1,pp.52-3.

First performed: c.June? 1672 (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 512:14 (1678)

Author: Thomas Shipman

Source/s of Music: Not recorded in Day and Murrie

Text of song:

They hear the tuning of a voice, and Essays at a Tune. Navar steals out towards the Arbour. Gril. steps and lissens to this---

SONG by Gabril unseen.

Love shot himself into my breast like flame;
And soon as ever there he came,
My heart was all in fire:
Nothing so scorching as Desire!
Yet in those flames I fry:
And tho I ev'ry minute try,
I cannot, cannot, oh! I cannot dy!

Like Love I'm blind, stark blind, although I see;
No object fits my Eyes but He.
I had him once in view;
When like departing breath he flew.
Each night I wishing lie,
Wasting my soul in every Sigh;
Yet cannot, cannot, oh! I cannot dy!

My Soul can never from my Body part,
'Til I find him who has my heart.
When I that blessing spy,
O I betwixt his Arms could dy!
But 'till I be possest
Of joys that now are only guest,
I cannot, cannot, oh! I cannot rest!

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Item Code: TSO1

First line: A lass there lives upon the green

Source Edition: Oroonoko (1695), 2.3, pp.27-8.

First performed: November 1695 (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 514:12 (1696)

Author: Thomas Southerne

Composer: Raphael Courteville ( nwc)

Lyrics: Sir Harry Sheers

Performer/s: the "Boy"

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.272, n.1925 [Music] Playford, Henry, Deliciae Musicae...Fourth Book (1696), pp.1-3 (UMI(2) 2094:11) et al.

Text of song:

Blan. The Men are all in love with fair Clemene
As much as you are: and the Women hate her,
From an instinct of natural jealousie.
They sing, and dance, and try their little tricks
To entertain her, and divert her sadness.
May be she is among 'em: shall we see? [Exeunt.

The Scene drawn shews the Slaves, Men, Women, and Children upon the Ground, some rise and dance, others sing the following Songs.

A SONG. [By an unknown hand.] Sett by Mr. Courtevill, and sung by the Boy to Miss Cross.

I.

A Lass there lives upon the Green,
Cou'd I her Picture draw;
A brighter Nymph was never seen,
That looks, and reigns a little Queen,
And keeps the Swains in awe.

II.

Her Eyes are Cupid's Darts, and Wings,
Her Eyebrows are his Bow;
Her Silken Hair the Silver-Strings,
Which sure and swift destruction brings
To all the Vale below.

III.

If Pastorella's dawning Light
Can warm, and wound us so:
Her Noon will shine so piercing bright,
Each glancing beam will kill outright,
And every Swain subdue.

<NOTE: The next song follows immediately after this one>.

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Item Code: TSO2

First line: Bright Cynthia's pow'r divinely great

Source Edition: Oroonoko (1695), 2.3, p.29.

First performed: November 1695 (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 514:12 (1696)

Author: Thomas Southerne

Composer: Raphael Courteville ( nwc)

Lyrics: Thomas Cheeke

Performer/s: Mr. Leveridge

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.186, n.418 [Music] Playford, Henry, Deliciae Musicae...Fourth Book (1696), pp.3-6 (UMI(2) 2094:11) et al.

Text of song:

<NOTE: This song follows immediately after the previous one>.

A SONG, by Mr. Cheek. Sett by Mr. Courtevill, and sung by Mr. Leveridge.

I.

Bright Cynthia's Pow'r divinely great,
What Heart is not obeying?
A thousand Cupids on her wait,
And in her Eyes are playing.

II.

She seems the Queen of Love to reign,
For She alone dispences
Such Sweets, as best can entertain
The Gust of all the Senses.

III.

Her Face a charming prospect brings;
Her Breath gives balmy Blisses:
I hear an Angel, when she sings,
And taste of Heaven in Kisses.

IV.

Four Senses thus she feasts with joy,
From Nature's richest Treasure:
Let me the other Sense employ,
And I shall dye with pleasure.

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Item Code: TSO3

First line: Celemene pray tell me [When those pretty eyes I see]

Source Edition: Oroonoko (1695), song not printed in play.

First performed: November 1695 (Danchin)

UMI(2) reel no.: 514:12 (1696)

Author: Thomas Southerne

Composer: Henry Purcell ( nwc)

Performer/s: 'the Boy and Girl'

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.191, n.507 [Music] Playford, Henry, Deliciae Musicae...Fourth Book (1696), pp.7-10 (UMI(2) 2094:11) et al.

Text of song:

He. Celemene, pray tell me,
When those pretty Eyes I see;
Why my Heart beats in my Breast?
Why it will not let me rest?
Why this trembling too all o'er;
Pains I never felt before:
And when thus I touch your Hand,
Why I wish I was a Man?

She. How shou'd I know more than you?
Yet wou'd be a Woman too.
When you wash your self and play,
I methinks cou'd look all day;
Nay just now am pleas'd so well,
Shou'd you Kiss me I won't tell;
No, no I won't tell, I won't tell,
Shou'd you Kiss me I won't tell.

He. Tho' I cou'd do that all day,
And desire no better play:
Sure in Love there's something more,
Which makes Mamma so bigg before.

She. Once by chance I heard it nam'd;
Don't ask what for I'm asham'd:
Stay but till you're past Fifteen,
Then you'll know what 'tis I mean,
Then you'll know what 'tis I mean.

He. However lose not present bliss;
But now we're alone let's Kiss,
She. My Breasts do so heave.
He. My Heart does so pant.
She. There's something more we want,
There's something more we want.

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Item Code: TSP1

First line: Great Psyche goddess of each field and grove

Source Edition: Psyche, A Tragedy (1675), 1.1, p.3.

First performed: 27 February 1675

UMI(2) reel no.: 334:6

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Composer: Matthew Locke

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.231, n.1204 [Music] Score is in The English Opera, or The Vocal Musick in Psyche (1675), pp.1-3.

Text of song:

Enter Pan with his Followers, and Sings in Recitative.

Pan sings. Great Psyche, Goddess of each Field and Grove,
Whom every Prince and every God does love:
To your all-commanding hand
Pan yields his Sovereign Command:
For you the Shepherds Pipe and Sing,
And with their Nymphs Dance in a Ring:
Fruits shall they bring, and pretty Garlands weave,
And shall the Meads of all their Sweets bereave:
Vertumnus and Flora their Tribute shall pay,
And to Psyche shall dedicate this happy day.
The Sylvans and Dryads shall Dance all around,
And Psyche dread Queen of the Place shall be Crown'd.
My Lov'd Syrinx and Eccho shall sing and shall play,
And to Psyche shall dedicate this happy day.
Chor. And Pan, who before all here did command,
Now resigns all his Empire to Psyche's fair hand.

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Item Code: TSP2

First line: Great Psyche shall find no such pleasure as here

Source Edition: Psyche, A Tragedy (1675), 1.1, pp.4-5.

First performed: 27 February 1675

UMI(2) reel no.: 334:6

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Composer: Matthew Locke

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.231, n.1205 [Music] Score is in The English Opera, or The Vocal Musick in Psyche (1675), pp.4-6.

Text of song:

A Short Symphony of Rustick Musick...The Dryads and Sylvans presenting their Offerings. One sings.

1. Voice. Great Psyche shall find no such pleasures as here
Eccho. no such pleasures as here
as here.
2. Voices. Where her dutiful Subjects shall all stand in awe
shall all stand in awe
in awe.
3. Voices. Her Frowns and her Smiles shall give us all Law
give us all Law
all Law.
4. Voices. And from us of Rebellion she need have no fear
she need have no fear
no fear.

Voices, Flajolets, Violins, Cornets, Sackbutts, Hoa-boys: All joyn in Chorus.

Chor. How happy are those that inhabit this place,
Where a sign is ne'r heard, where no falshood we meet,
Where each single heart agress with the face.
No climate was ever so calm and so sweet.
Eccho. was ever so calm and so sweet
so calm and so sweet
so sweet.
1. Voice. To beauteous Psyche all devotion is due.
Eccho. all devotion is due
is due.
2. Voices. Our humble Offerings she will not despise
Eccho. she will not despise
despise.
3. Voices. Since the Tribute is offer'd from hearts that are true.
from hearts that are true.
are true.
4. Voices. From hearts all devoted to Psyche's bright Eyes
to Psyche's bright Eyes
bright Eyes.
Chor. How happy are those, &c.

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Item Code: TSP3

First line: Envy 'gainst Psyche such black storms shall raise

Source Edition: Psyche, A Tragedy (1675), 1.1, p.7.

First performed: 27 February 1675

UMI(2) reel no.: 334:6

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Composer: Matthew Locke

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.214, n.910 [Music] Score is in The English Opera, or The Vocal Musick in Psyche (1675), pp.6-7.

Text of song:

Envy sings. Envy 'gainst Psyche such black storms shall raise,
As all her pow'rful beams shall ne'r dispel:
Beyond her strength shall be her suffering;
Her to the greatest misery I'll bring,
And e'er I've done, I'll send her down to Hell.
1. Fury. In Hell too late she shall relent,
And all her arrogance repent.
2. Fury. We Furies will torment your Soul.
And you shall weep and houl.
1. Fury. And at the sight of ev'ry Snake
Tremble and quake.
2. Fury. There you shall mourn eternally,
And to the quick shall feel each lash we give:
1. Fury. There you shall always wish to die,
And yet in spight of you shall always live.
Chor. of all. There you shall always, &c.

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Item Code: TSP4

First line: With kindness I your pray'rs receive

Source Edition: Psyche, A Tragedy (1675), 1.1, p.13.

First performed: 27 February 1675

UMI(2) reel no.: 334:6

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Composer: Matthew Locke

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.391, n.3995 [Music] Score is in The English Opera, or The Vocal Musick in Psyche (1675), pp.8-9.

Text of song:

Venus sings. With kindness I your pray'rs receive,
And to your hopes success will give.
I have with anger seen Mankind adore
Your Sister's beauty, and her scorn deplore.
Which they shall do no more.
For their Idolatry I'll so resent,
As shall your wishes to the full content.
Your Father is with Psyche now,
And to Apollo's Oracle they'll go.
Her Destiny to know.
I by the God of Wit shall be obey'd,
For Wit to Beauty still is subject made.
He'll so resent your cause and mine,
That you will not repine,
But will applaud the Oracle's Design.

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Item Code: TSP5

First line: Let's to Apollo's altar now repair

Source Edition: Psyche, A Tragedy (1675), 2.1, pp.15-7.

First performed: 27 February 1675

UMI(2) reel no.: 334:6

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Composer: Matthew Locke

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.279, n.2035 [Music] Score is in The English Opera, or The Vocal Musick in Psyche (1675), pp.10-14.

Text of song:

The Scene is the Temple of Apollo Delphicus...This following Hymn is sung in Chorus.

Chor. Let's to Apollo's Altar now repair,
And offer up our Vows and Pray'r;
Let us enquire fair Psyche's destiny.
Repeat. The Gods to her will sure propitious be,
If Innocence and Beauty may go free.
Ch<ief>. P<riest>. Go on, and to the Altar lead.

Chief Priest turns to the People, and sings on.

This hallow'd ground let no one tread,
Who is defil'd with Whoredom, or with Bloud,
Lest all our pray'rs should be for them withstood.
Let none be present at our Sacrifice,
But of an humble uncorrupted mind.
The God for wicked men will all our vows despise.
And will to all our wishes be unkind.

[By this time they come near the Altar...holding the Altar in his hands, sings alone, as follows.

Ch. Pr. Son of Latona and great Jove,
In Delos born, which thou so much dost love:
Great God of Physick and of Archery,
Of wisdom, Wit, and Harmony;
God of all Divinations too.
Chor of Voices and Instrum. To thee our vows and pray'rs are due.
To thee our, &c.

[Chief Priest kneels, kisses the Altar, then rises and sings.

Ch. Pr. Thou gav'st the Cruel Serpent Python death,
Depriv'dst the Giant Tyrion of his breath:
Thou dist the monstrous Cyclops too destroy,
Who form'd the Thunder, which did kill thy Son.
Chor. Thou light of all our life, and all our joy,
Our Offerings with our hearts are all thine own.

[Chief Priest kneels, and kisses the Altar again.

Ch. Pr. By sacred Hyacinth, thy much lov'd Flower,
By Daphne's memory we thee implore,
Thou wou'dst be present at our Sacrifice,
And not our humble Offerings despise.
Chorus of Voices and Instrum. And we for ever will thy praise advance.
Thou Author of all Light and Heat.
Let Pipes and Timbrels sound, and let them dance.
Each day our worship we'll repeat,
Each day, &c.

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Item Code: TSP6

First line: To Apollo our celestial king

Source Edition: Psyche, A Tragedy (1675), 2.1, p.17.

First performed: 27 February 1675

UMI(2) reel no.: 334:6

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Composer: Matthew Locke

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.357, n.3409 [Music] Score is in The English Opera, or The Vocal Musick in Psyche (1675), p.15.

Text of song:

They <Priests and Boys> sing as follows:

Chor. To Apollo our Celestial King,
We will Io Paean sing;
Io Paean, Io Paean,
Io Paean will we sing:

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Item Code: TSP7

First line: Break distracted heart there is no cure

Source Edition: Psyche, A Tragedy (1675), 2.1, pp.23-4.

First performed: 27 February 1675

UMI(2) reel no.: 334:6

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Composer: Matthew Locke

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.186, n.413 [Music] Score is in The English Opera, or The Vocal Musick in Psyche (1675), pp.16-8.

Text of song:

Two despairing Men and two despairing Women sing as follows.

1. Man. Break, break, distracted heart, there is no cure
For Love, my monds too raging Calenture.
1. Wom. Sighs which in other passions vent,
And give them ease when they lament,
Are but the bellows to my hot desire.
2. Wom. And tears in me not quench, but nourish fire.
2. Man. Nothing can mollifie my grief,
Or give my passion a relief.
1. Man. Love is not like our earthly fire,
You soon may smoother out that flame;
Concealing does increase desire,
No opposition Love can tame.
2. Wom. Despair in Love transcends all pain,
Lost hope will ne'r return again.
1. Wom. In Hell there's no such misery,
As now oppresses me.
I this one pang alone
Wou'd change for Sisyphus his Stone.
2. Man. I would the torments which I feel
Change for Ixion's Wheel.
2. Wom. The Vulture should on me for ever feed,
Rather then thus my heart for Love should bleed.
1. Man. Oh Tantalus! for thy eternal Thirst;
I'm more on Earth then thou in Hell accurst.
1. Wom. Was ever grief like mine?
2. Wom. Like mine?
1. Man. Like mine?
2. Man. Like mine?
Chorus. Was ever grief like mine?
Was ever, &c.
2. Wom. Nothing but death can cure our misery.
1. Wom. I'll die.
1. Man. I'll die.
2. Man. I'll die.
Chorus. Nothing but death can cure our misery.
Nothing but, &c.

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Item Code: TSP8

First line: Ye bold sons of earth that attend upon fire

Source Edition: Psyche, A Tragedy (1675), 3.1, pp.29-30.

First performed: 27 February 1675

UMI(2) reel no.: 334:6

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Composer: Matthew Locke

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.393, n.4031 [Music] Score is in The English Opera, or The Vocal Musick in Psyche (1675), p.19.

Text of song:

Vulcan sings. Ye bold Sons of Earth, that attend upon Fire,
Make haste with the Palace, least Cupid should stay;
You must not be lazy when Love does require,
For Love is impatient, and brooks no delay.
When Cupid you serve, you must toil and must sweat,
Redouble your blows, and your labour repeat.

The vigorous young God's not with laziness serv'd,
He makes all his Vassals their diligence show,
And nothing from him but with pains is deserv'd;
Is his favourite still. The confederate Fool,
He as useless lays by for a pitiful Tool.

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Item Code: TSP9

First line: This palace is finish'd and the other shall be

Source Edition: Psyche, A Tragedy (1675), 3.1, p.30-1.

First performed: 27 February 1675

UMI(2) reel no.: 334:6

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Composer: Matthew Locke

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.350, n.3281 [Music] Score is in The English Opera, or The Vocal Musick in Psyche (1675), pp.20-2.

Text of song:

1. Cycl. This Palace is finish'd, and the other shall be
Made fit for his small Deity.
2. Cycl. But fire makes us cholerick, and apt to repine,
Unless you will give some us Wine.
Chor. With swinging great Bowls,
Let's refresh our dry Souls,
And then we'll work with a Clink, clink, clink;
But first let us drink, but first let us drink.

Vulcan. Let each take his Bowl then, and hold it to his nose,
Then let him redouble his blows.
Cycl. Nay, stint us not so, but let each take his two,
And twice as much then we can do.
Chor. With swinging great Bowls,
Let's refresh &c.

Vulc. Ye Slaves, will you never from drunkenness refrain?
Remember Ulysses again.
Cycl. Ulysses is a Dog, were he here he shou'd find
We'd scorn him, and drink our selved blind.
Chor. With swinging great Bowls,
Let's refresh, &c. [They take their Kans in their hands.
Pyrac. Here, Harpes, to you. Harp. Here, Brontes, to you,
And so take each Cyclops his due.
Bron. To thee, Steropes. Ster. Pyracmon, to thee.
Omn. And thus in our Cups wee'll agree.
Chor. With swinging great Bowls,
Let's refresh, &c.

Vulc. Be gone, or great Jove will for Thunder bolts stay,
The world grows so wicked wach day.
Cycl. He has less need of Thunder then we have of Wine:
We'd drink, though great Jove shou'd repine.
Chor. With swinging great Bowls,
Let's refresh, &c.

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Item Code: TSP10

First line: All joy to fair psyche in this happy place

Source Edition: Psyche, A Tragedy (1675), 3.1, p.36.

First performed: 27 February 1675

UMI(2) reel no.: 334:6

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Composer: Matthew Locke

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.169, n.116 [Music] Score is in The English Opera, or The Vocal Musick in Psyche (1675), pp.22-6 and others.

Text of song:

This following Song is sung by invisible Singers.

All joy to fair Psyche in this happy place,
And to our great Master, who her shall embrace:
May never his Love nor her Beauty decay,
But be warm as the Spring, and still fresh as the Day.
Chor. No Mortals on earth ever wretched cou'd prove,
If still while they liv'd, they'd be always om love.

There's none without Love ever happy can be,
Without it each Brute were as happy as we.
The knowledge men boast of does nothing but vex,
And their wandering Reason their minds does perplex.
But no Mortals, &c.

Love's sighs and his tears are mix'd with delights,
But were he still pester'd with cares and with frights,
Shou'd a thousand more troubles a Lover invade,
By one happy moment they'd fully be paid.
Chor. No Mortals, &c.

Then lose not a moments, but in pleasure employ it,
For a moment once lost will always be so;
Your Youth requires Love, let it fully enjoy it,
And push on your Nature as far as 'twill go.
Chor, No Mortals, &c.

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Item Code: TSP11

First line: Let us loudly rejoice

Source Edition: Psyche, A Tragedy (1675), 3.1, pp.38-9.

First performed: 27 February 1675

UMI(2) reel no.: 334:6

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Composer: Matthew Locke

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.278, n.2018 [Music] Score is in The English Opera, or The Vocal Musick in Psyche (1675), pp.26-31.

Text of song:

The Priests sing this following Song, and dance to't.

Let us loudly rejoyce,
With glad heart and with voice;
For the Monster is dead,
And here is his head.
No more shall our Wives
Be afraid of their lives,
Nor our Daughters by Serpents miscarry.
The Oracle then
Shall bestow them on Men,
And they not with Monster's shall marry.
Let us lowdly rejoyce
With glad heart and with voice;
For the Monster is dead,
And here is his head.

Praesul sings. Great God of War to thee
We offer up our thanks and pray'r
For by thy mighty Deity
Triumphing Conquerours we are.
Chor. Thou'rt great among the heavenly race,
And onely to the Thunderer giv'st place.

Praesul. Jove is thy father, but does not exceed
Thy Deity on any score.
Thou, when thou wilt, canst make the whole world bleed,
And then canst heal their breaches by thy power.
Chor. 'Tis thou that must to Armies give success,
Thou that must Kingdoms too with safety bless,
Thou that must bring, and then must guard their peace.

They dance...After the Dance---

Praes. sings. While we to Mars his praises sing,
A Horse, th'appointed Victim, bring.

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Item Code: TSP12

First line: Great god of war if thou dost not despise

Source Edition: Psyche, A Tragedy (1675), 3.1, pp.39-40.

First performed: 27 February 1675

UMI(2) reel no.: 334:6

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Composer: Matthew Locke

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.231, n.1198 [Music] Score is in The English Opera, or The Vocal Musick in Psyche (1675), pp.33-5.

Text of song:

Venus sings. Great God of War, if thou dost not despise
The power of my victorious eyes,
Reject this Sacrifice.
My Deity they disrespect,
My Altars they neglect,
And Psyche onely they adore,
Whom they shall see no more.
Have I yet left such influence on your heart,
As to enjoyn you wou'd take my part.
By some known token punish their offence,
And let them know their insolence.

Mars. So much your influence on me remains,
That still I glory in my chains.
What ever you command, shall be
A sov'reign Law to me.
These saucy Mortals soon shall see
What 'tis to disrespect your Deity.
To show how much for you I them despise,
Since they with Venus dare contend,
Ye powers of Hell your Furies send,
And interrupt their Sacrifice.

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Item Code: TSP13

First line: Let old age in its envy and malice take pleasure

Source Edition: Psyche, A Tragedy (1675), 4.1, p.44.

First performed: 27 February 1675

UMI(2) reel no.: 334:6

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Composer: Matthew Locke

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.276, n.1984 [Music] Score is in The English Opera, or The Vocal Musick in Psyche (1675), pp.36-40.

Text of song:

Cup. What I to my lov'd Psyche owe:
For her shall Quires of Cupids sing,
For her the Sphears shall their loud Musick bring.

SONG.

Let old Age in its envy and malice take pleasure,
In business that's sower, and in hoarding up treasure:
By dulness seem wise, be still peevish and nice;
And what they cannot follow, let them rail at as vice.

Wise Youth will in Wine and in Beauty delight,
Will revel all day, and will sport all the night.
For never to love, wou'd be never to live,
And Love must from Wine its new vigour receive.

How insipid were life without those delights,
In which lusty hot Youth spend their days and their nights;
Of our nauseous dull beings we too soon should be cloy'd,
Without those bless'd joys which Fools onely avoid.

Unhappy grave Wretches, who live by false measure,
And for empty vain shadows refuse real pleasure;
To such Fools while vast joys on the witty are waiting,
Life's a tedious long journey without ever baiting.

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Item Code: TSP14

First line: Stay this act will much defile my streams

Source Edition: Psyche, A Tragedy (1675), 4.1, p.52.

First performed: 27 February 1675

UMI(2) reel no.: 334:6

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Composer: Matthew Locke

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.337, n.3065 [Music] Score is in The English Opera, or The Vocal Musick in Psyche (1675), pp.41-3.

Text of song:

The God <of the River> sings. Stay, stay, this act will much defile my Streams:
With a short patience suffer these extreames.
Heav'n has for thee a milder Fate in Store,
The time shall be when thou shalt weep no more.
And yet fair Psyche ne'r shall die.
1. Nymph. She ne'r shall die.
2. Nymph. She ne'r shall die.
Chor. She ne'r shall die:
But shall be crown'd with Immortality.
But shall be, &c.

The God sings again. Venus approaches, from her anger flie;
More troubles yet your constancy must try.
But th' happy minute will ere long arrive,
That will to you eternal freedom give.
And yet fair Psyche ne'r shall die.
1. Nymph. She ne'r shall die.
2. Nymph. She ne'r shall die.
Chor. But shall be crown'd with Immortality.
But shall be, &c.

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Item Code: TSP15

First line: To what great distresses proud Psyche is brought

Source Edition: Psyche, A Tragedy (1675), 5.1, pp.53 [55]-6.

First performed: 27 February 1675

UMI(2) reel no.: 334:6

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Composer: Matthew Locke

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.359, n.3447 [Music] Score is in The English Opera, or The Vocal Musick in Psyche (1675), pp.44-7.

Text of song:

The Scene represents Hell...The following Song is sung by Furies and Devils.

To what great distresses proud Psyche is brought ?
Oh the brave mischiefs our malice has wrought!
Such Actions become the black Subjects of Hell,
Our great Prince of Darkness who e'r will serve well,
Chor. Must to all Mortals, nay, Gods shew their spight,
And in horrour and torments of others delight.

How cool are our flames, and how light are our chains,
If our craft of our cruelty Souls enow gains:
In perpetual houlings and groans we take pleasure,
Our joys by the torments of others we measure.
Chor. To rob Heav'n of the Fair is our greatest delight,
To darkness seducing the Subjects of Light.

How little did Heav'n of its Empire take care,
To let Pluto take the Rich, Witty, and Fair:
While it does for it self Fools and Monsters preserve,
The Blind, Ugly and Poor, and the Cripple reserve.
Chor. Heav'n all the worst Subjects for it self does prepare,
And leaves all the best for the Prince of the Air.

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Item Code: TSP16

First line: Refrain your tears you shall no pris'ner be

Source Edition: Psyche, A Tragedy (1675), 5.1, pp.57-8.

First performed: 27 February 1675

UMI(2) reel no.: 334:6

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Composer: Matthew Locke

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.322, n.2790 [Music] Score is in The English Opera, or The Vocal Musick in Psyche (1675), pp.48-51.

Text of song:

Pluto sings. Refrain your tears, you shall no pris'ner be;
Beauty and Innocence in Hell are free:
They're Treasons, Murders, Rapes and Thefts that bring
Subjects to th'infernal King.
You are no Subject of this place,
A God you must embrace.
From Hell to Heaven you must translated be,
Where you shall live and love to all eternity.

Proserp. Psyche, draw near: with thee this Present take,
Which given to Venus soon thy peace will make:
Of Beauty, 'tis a Treasury Divine,
And you're the Messenger she did design.
Lost Beauty this will soon restore,
And all defect's repair:
Mortals will now afresh her Beams adore,
And ease her mind of jealousie and care,
No Beauty that has this can e'r despair.

Pluto. Here are your Sisters, who your life once sought:
Their malice to this place has Psyche brought,
And against her all these dire mischiefs wrought.
For ever here they shall remain,
And shall in Hell suffer eternal pain.
But Psyche shall a Deity embrace.
Proserp. Be gone, fair Psyche!
Pluto. Be gone, fair Psyche!
Both. Be gone, fair Psyche, from this place!
Chor. of all. For Psyche must the God of Love embrace.
For Psyche must the God of Love embrace.

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Item Code: TSP17

First line: Assemble all the [ye] heavenly choir

Source Edition: Psyche, A Tragedy (1675), 5.[2], pp.67-8.

First performed: 27 February 1675

UMI(2) reel no.: 334:6

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Composer: Matthew Locke

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.177, n.260 [Music] Score is in The English Opera, or The Vocal Musick in Psyche (1675), pp.53-5.

Text of song:

Apollo sings.

Apollo. Assemble all the Heavenly Quire,
And let the God of Love inspire
Your hearts with his Celestial Fire.
The God of Love's a happy Lover made,
His ravisging delights shall never fade.
Chorus... With his Immortal Psyche He
Now tastes those joys which ought to be
As lasting as Eternity.

Apollo. Come, Lovers, from the Elizian Groves,
And celebrate these heavenly Loves. [A Symphony of Pipes...
Apollo. Bacchus with all your jolly Crew,
Come revel at these Nuptials too. [A Symphony of Hoboys...
Apollo. Come all ye winged Spirits of the skies,
And all ye mighty Deities [A Symphony of Recorders...
Apollo. You all his humble Vassals are,
And in his joy should have a share.
Chor. With his immortal Psyche he
Now tastes, &c.

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Item Code: TSP18

First line: On earth by unkindness are often destroy'd

Source Edition: Psyche, A Tragedy (1675), 5.[2], p.68.

First performed: 27 February 1675

UMI(2) reel no.: 334:6

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Composer: Matthew Locke

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.311, n.2606 [Music] Score is in The English Opera, or The Vocal Musick in Psyche (1675), pp.55-6.

Text of song:

I. Elizian Lover sings a Treble.

On Earth by unkindness are often destroy'd
The delights in the Nymphs who are so much ador'd;
Or else the poor Lovers by kindness are cloy'd,
So faint are the pleasures their Love does afford.

2. Treble. With sighs and with tears,
With jealousies, griefs, and with fears,
The wretched poor Lover is tost,
For a few moments pleasure his liberty's lost.

3.Treble. How short are those moments, yet how few they employ!
Ah how short! ah how short is the joy!
2. Treble, Ah how short! ah how short is the joy!
I. Treble. Ah how short! ah how short is the joy!

Chorus of three Trebles... Thus wretched Mankind does suffer below,
And in Heav'n each Godhead to Cupid does bow;
But Love, Love, was ne'r perfect till now.

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Item Code: TSP19

First line: Behold the god [of] whose mighty pow'r

Source Edition: Psyche, A Tragedy (1675), 5.[2], p.69.

First performed: 27 February 1675

UMI(2) reel no.: 334:6

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Composer: Matthew Locke

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.182, n.344 [Music] Score is in The English Opera, or The Vocal Musick in Psyche (1675), pp.58-9.

Text of song:

Mars sings... Behold the God, whose mighty pow'r
We all have felt, and all adore;
To him I all my Triumphs owe,
To him my Trophies I must yield:
He makes victorious Monarchs bow,
And from the Conq'ror gains the Field.
Chorus... He turns all the horrours of War to delight,
And were there no Love, no Heroes would fight. [A Returnello...

Mars. Honours to Battel spurs them on,
Honour brings Pow'r when War is done:
But who would venture Life for Pow'r,
Onely to govern dull Mankind?
'Tis Woman, Woman they adore;
For Beauty they those dangers find.
Chorus... No Princes the toyls of Ambition would prove,
Or Dominion would prize, if it were not for Love. [A Returnello...

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Item Code: TSP20

First line: The delights of the bottle and the charms of good wine

Source Edition: Psyche, A Tragedy (1675), 5.[2], pp.70-1.

First performed: 27 February 1675

UMI(2) reel no.: 334:6

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Composer: Matthew Locke

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.210, n.838 [Music] Score is in The English Opera, or The Vocal Musick in Psyche (1675), pp.59-60 and others.

Text of song:

Bacchus. The delights of the Bottle, and the charms of good Wine,
To the power and the pleasures of Love must resign:
Though the Night in the joys of good Drinking be past,
The debauches but till the next Morning will last.
Chorus... But Loves great Debauch is more lasting and strong;
For that often lasts a man all his life long. A Returnello again.

Bacchus. Love and Wine are the Bonds which fasten us all;
The World but for these to confusion would fall:
Were it not for the pleasures of Love and good Wine,
Mankind for each trifle their lives would resign.
Chorus. They'd not value dull life, or would live without thinking;
Nor would Kings rule the World but for Love and good drinking. A Returnello again.

Apollo. But to Love! to Love the great union they owe;
All in Earth and in Heav'n to his Scepter must bow.
A general Chorus... All joy to this Celestial Pair,
Who thus by Heav'n united are:
'Tis a great thing, worth Heav'ns design,
To make Love's Pow'r with Beauty's joyn.

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Item Code: TSP21

First line: All joy to this celestial pair

Source Edition: Psyche, A Tragedy (1675), song not printed in play.

First performed: 27 February 1675

UMI(2) reel no.: 334:6

Author: Thomas Shadwell

Composer: Matthew Locke

Source/s of Music: Recorded in Day and Murrie, p.169, n.119 [Music] Score is in The English Opera, or The Vocal Musick in Psyche (1675), p.61. Score unavailable to compiler.

Text of song:

Lyrics unavailable to compiler.

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