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Ivotuk ATLAS field site north slope Alaska

University of Alaska Fairbanks

Artic Transitions in the Land Atmosphere System (ATLAS)

Research Data

All data presented here is available online and provided through the JOSS data archive. It is divided into sites and data set types here. The following data set summaries are given below. More details can be found in the readme files:

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DATA SET OVERVIEW

Ivotuk Flux and Climate 1998

The Ivotuk climate and flux data set was taken over the 1998 growing season and encompassed four sites designated I1-I4. Fluxes were measured using the eddy covariance technique and were collected along with standard meteorological variables. Flux data includes sensible heat, latent heat, ground heat, and CO2 fluxes along with net radiation and other turbulence parameters.

The data set also contains infrared gas analyzer measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapor. The meteorological measurements include soil heat flux plate, soil temperature (top 10 cm), volumetric soil water content, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, wind direction, incoming and outgoing shortwave radiation, incoming and outgoing longwave radiation, and rainfall. The data is quality checked and non-valid data is flagged. The following sites were measured during 1999:

Moist Acidic Tundra (MAT) Site I1, Latitude 68 29.2406550, Longitude 155 44.5656316, Measurement period 27th June to 9th August
Moist Non-Acidic Tundra (MNT), Site I3, Latitude 68 28.7703311,
Longitude 155 44.1566667, Measurement period 18th July to 31st July
Shrub Tundra (SHRUB), Site I2, Latitude 68 28.7340418, Longitude 155 44.2855911, Measurement period 29th June to 18th July
MOSS Dominated (Sphagnum sp.) Moist Acidic Tundra (MOSS), Site I4, Latitude 68 28.8237984, Longitude 155 44.6473464
Measurement period 31st July to 11th August

Ivotuk Leaf Area Index 1998

LAI measurements were taken at approximately peak biomass at the Ivotuk grid sites at each grid point in 1998. The measurements were taken with the Li-cor LAI 2000 Canopy Analyzer. Grid point measurements reflects the average of four ground measurements, one in each ordinal direction from the pin flag marking the grid point. The measurements were taken on the following days; MAT 8/1/98, MNT 7/30/98, Shrub 7/6/98, Moss 8/3/98.

Council Flux and Climate 1999

The Council 1999 climate and flux data set was taken over the 1999 growing season. Data were collected at Council (N64o50.499' W163o41.591') on the Seward Peninsula, located approximately 70 miles to the northeast of Nome (Figure 1). The Peninsula itself encompasses a diversity of landscape and ecosystem types created by the various climatic and topographical settings. The climate of the Peninsula is annually slightly wetter and warmer than the north slope of Alaska [Fleming et al. 2000]. The five sites were termed tundra, low shrub, shrub, woodland (treeline) and forest. These sites were located within a 5 km radius of Council.

This region of tundra and forest is representative of the contrast in vegetation that may be observed across northern treeline [Lafleur et al. 1992].

Fluxes were measured using the eddy covariance technique and were collected along with standard meteorological variables. Flux data includes sensible heat, latent heat, ground heat, and CO2 fluxes along with net radiation and other turbulence parameters. The data set also contains infrared gas analyzer measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapor. The meteorological measurements include soil heat flux plate, soil temperature (top 10 cm), volumetric soil water content, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, wind direction, incoming and outgoing shortwave radiation, incoming and outgoing longwave radiation, and rainfall. The data is quality checked and non-valid data is flagged.

There were three flux and climate towers operating at Council, Seward Peninsula, during 1999. Two towers were located at the tundra and forest sites. The third tower was a mobile tower and covered four different surface types (Lowshrub, shrub, woodland, and burned tundra). The data have been divided by surface type and also whether it was flux or climate data.
SPRUCE FOREST (C1), Location: N 64o 54.456' W 163o 40.469'
WOODLAND (C4), Location: N 64o 53.997' W 163o 39.863'
LOWSHRUB (C6), Location: N 64o 53.47' W 163o 38.61'
TUNDRA SITE (C2), Location: N 64o50.499' W163o41.591'
BURN SITE (C8), Location: N 65o12.147' W 164o18.477 (fire scar length 3.15 km and 1.3 km wide)
SHRUB SITE (C3), Location: N 64o56.141 W 164o44.142

Council Flux and Climate 2000

The Council 2000 climate and flux data set was taken over the 2000 growing season. Data were collected at Council (N64o50.499' W163o41.591') on the Seward Peninsula, located approximately 70 miles to the northeast of Nome (Figure 1). The Peninsula itself encompasses a diversity of landscape and ecosystem types created by the various climatic and topographical settings. The climate of the Peninsula is annually slightly wetter and warmer than the north slope of Alaska [Fleming et al. 2000]. Sites were located within a 5 km radius of Council.

This region of tundra and forest is representative of the contrast in vegetation that may be observed across northern treeline [Lafleur et al. 1992].

There were three flux and climate towers operating at Council, Seward Peninsula, during 2000. Two towers were located at the tundra and forest sites. The third tower was a mobile tower and covered four different surface types (Tall shrub, tundra ISS2, burned tundra, heath and shallow thaw lake). The data have been divided by site and also whether it was flux or climate data.

Fluxes were measured using the eddy covariance technique and were collected along with standard meteorological variables. Flux data includes sensible heat, latent heat, ground heat, and CO2 fluxes along with net radiation and other turbulence parameters. The data set also contains infrared gas analyzer measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapor. The meteorological measurements include soil heat flux plate, soil temperature (top 10 cm), volumetric soil water content, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, wind direction, incoming and outgoing shortwave radiation, incoming and outgoing longwave radiation, and rainfall. The data is quality checked and non-valid data is flagged.

SPRUCE FOREST , Location: N 64o 54.456' W 163o 40.469', Data dates: 13/5-29/8
TUNDRA SITE , Location: N 64o50.499' W163o41.591', Data dates: 15/5-29/8
BURN SITE , Location: N 65o12.147' W 164o18.477 (fire scar length 3.15 km and 1.3 km wide), Data dates: 18 june-31 June
SHRUB SITE , Location: N 64o56.141 W 164o44.142, Data dates: 10 May-19 June
ISS2 - Second tundra site at NCAR ISS SITE, Location: N W , Data dates: 19 June to 16 July
HEATH SITE , Location: N 64o 43.626 W 163o 56.400, Data dates: 1 August to 15 August
LAKE - Shallow lake, Location: N W, Data dates: 18 August to 27 August

Ivotuk Flux and Climate spring 2000

A single flux tower was constructed by Jason Beringer and operated during the snowmelt period at Ivotuk by Matt Sturm. Data processing and analysis was undertaken by Jason Beringer. Climate data were collected by Larry Hinzman. Sensible, latent and CO2 fluxes were measured along with net radiation from Larry Hinzman. A single tower was deployed to obtain microclimatic and eddy-covariance measurements in order to characterize the radiation, energy and trace gas exchanges during the snowmelt period. Measurements of radiation, energy and trace gas exchanges were made at over tundra using the eddy covariance technique [Eugster et al. 1997].

Data were taken at the Ivotuk MOSS site. MOSS (Sphagnum sp.) Dominated Moist Acidic Tundra (MOSS), Site I4, Latitude 68 28.8237984, Longitude 155 44.6473464, Elevation 552.839 m, Measurement period 8/5 to 14/6 year 2000.

Council 1999 Bulk density data

Sites at Council were primarily established for flux, climate and biomass data but several ancillary datasets were collected. This data set is the mean bulk density for the soil layers at each of the sites measured in 1999 at Council.

Council 2000 Understorey fluxes

There were three flux and climate towers operating at Council, Seward Peninsula, during 2000. Two towers were located at the tundra and forest sites. The third tower was a mobile tower and covered four different surface types (Tall shrub, tundra ISS2, burned tundra, heath and shallow thaw lake). The data presented here is an additional eddy covariance system that was established beneath the forest tower at Council at 2 m above the ground. This system measured below canopy fluxes from the ground surface and ground shrubs.

The data set was collected in conjunction with overstorey fluxes, mini lysimeter measurements of soil evaporation and sap flow measurements of tree transpiration.

The site was the SPRUCE FOREST, Location: N 64o 54.456' W 163o 40.469', Elevation: 275 feet, Slope: 3.3% (3o), Aspect: 140o TN, Data dates: 13/5-29/8, Average LAI: 2.7, Average vegetation height: 6.1m, Sonic Anemmeter:120o TN, Sonic Height: 2.20 m

Council 2000 Sap flow data

There were three flux and climate towers operating at Council, Seward Peninsula, during 2000. Two towers were located at the tundra and forest sites. The third tower was a mobile tower and covered four different surface types (Tall shrub, tundra ISS2, burned tundra, heath and shallow thaw lake).
The data presented here is sap flow measurements that provide daily total transpiration of the spruce forest in L/day.

This data was collected in conjunction with mini lysimeters to measure soil evaporation and an additional eddy covariance system that was established beneath the forest tower at Council at 2 m above the ground. This system measured below canopy fluxes from the ground surface and ground shrubs.

The site was the SPRUCE FOREST, Location: N 64o 54.456' W 163o 40.469', Elevation: 275 feet, Slope: 3.3% (3o), Aspect: 140o TN, Data dates: 13/5-29/8, Average LAI: 2.7, Average vegetation height: 6.1m.